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I am new in shell scripting and I need help. I have two strings :

Expected Dates: 12/17/2012 12/18/2012 12/19/2012 12/20/2012 12/21/2012 12/22/2012 12/23/2012
Eimx/MDW Dates: 12/17/2012 12/18/2012 12/19/2012 12/20/2012 12/21/2012 12/22/2012

I want to compare them and displaying the missing data.

I want to to a .sh script for that, how can I do it?

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Are this strings in the same file? –  Atropo Dec 28 '12 at 11:24
2  
What have you tried? –  Pez Cuckow Dec 28 '12 at 11:25
    
yes the string are in the same file –  Iuliana Dec 28 '12 at 13:03
    
your example looks like the easy case. Is it possible that 12/18/2012 would be missing from 2nd line, while all other dates are there? AND will that leave a "hole" in the line, or will the blank space still be at the end of the line. Don't answer as a comment, please update (edit link) your question and use the {} formatting tool at the top of the input box to indent your examples as code samples. Good luck. –  shellter Dec 28 '12 at 15:42

1 Answer 1

The question is not at all well defined, but perhaps something like:

#!/bin/sh

s1='Expected Dates: 12/17/2012 12/18/2012 12/23/2012'
s2='Eimx/MDW Dates: 12/17/2012 12/18/2012'
s1=${s1#*:}  # Trim the header (or start the loop in awk at i=3 )
s2=${s2#*:}

printf "$s1\n$s2\n" | awk  '
    NR==1 {for( i=1; i<=NF; i++) a[$i]=1 }
    NR==2 {for( i=1; i<=NF; i++) { if( ! a[$i] ) print $i; delete a[$i]; }}
    END{ for( i in a) print i}'
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thank you for help ! –  Iuliana Dec 31 '12 at 13:25
    
Thanks a lot, but can you explain me in details the code please ? Thanks a lot for help again :) –  Iuliana Jan 15 '13 at 14:49
    
@luliana What details need explaining? Two strings are assigned. The text up to and including the first : is removed. The two strings are printed as separate lines and piped to awk. While reading the first line, awk builds an array. While reading the second line, any date that does not appear in the array is printed while those in the array are deleted. At the end, anything left in the array is printed. –  William Pursell Jan 15 '13 at 16:48
    
Hello, thanks for help.I understand from a[$i]=1 that every position for the element from the array becames 1.At the and the first line is inverted meaning the '12/17/2012 12/18/2012 12/23/2012' '12/23/'becames '12/23/2012 12/18/2012 12/17/2012' .Did i understood ok? And if yes, why this inversion is necesarry ? –  Iuliana Jan 16 '13 at 7:31
    
@luliana The 'inversion' is merely a consequence of the fact that the awk array is printed back in a pseudo-random order. If order matters, an associative array is not sufficient without extra information to maintain that order. –  William Pursell Jan 16 '13 at 13:19

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