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I am playing around with some sockets, thread and mutexes. My question concerns threads and mutexes:

int ConnectionHandler::addNewSocket(){

    this->connectionList_mutex.lock();
    std::cout << "test1" << std::endl;
    this->connectionList_mutex.unlock();

    return 0;
}

int ConnectionHandler::main(){
    while(true){
        this->connectionList_mutex.lock();
        std::cout << "test2" << std::endl;
        this->connectionList_mutex.unlock();
    }

}`

The main function is running in one thread, while the addNewSocket is called by another thread. The problem is, that when addNewSocket is called once (by the second thread), the next unlock by thread 1 (main) will fail with a strange "signal SIGABRT". I have worked two days on this now, but i did not manage to get it fixed, sadly. I hope you can help me.

Edit: ConnectionHandler is a class, that has connectionList_mutex as a member.

Edit: Sometimes i also get this error: "Assertion failed: (ec == 0), function unlock, file /SourceCache/libcxx/libcxx-65.1/src/mutex.cpp, line 44." but it occurs randomly.

Edit: This is the whole class (Reduced to a minimum, should be context independant to a certain degree, but crashes when i put it right after a client connected, and works if i put it right after the start:

class ConnectionHandler{
public:
    ConnectionHandler();
    int addNewSocket();
private:
    int main();
    static void start(void * pThis);

    std::mutex connectionList_mutex;
};

ConnectionHandler::ConnectionHandler(){
    std::thread t(&this->start, this);
    t.detach();
}
void ConnectionHandler::start(void * pThis){
    ConnectionHandler *handlerThis;
    handlerThis = (ConnectionHandler *)pThis;
    handlerThis->main();
}


int ConnectionHandler::addNewSocket(){

    this->connectionList_mutex.lock();
    std::cout << "test1" << std::endl;
    this->connectionList_mutex.unlock();

    return 0;
}

int ConnectionHandler::main(){
    while(true){
        this->connectionList_mutex.lock();
        std::cout << "test2" << std::endl;
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(100));
        this->connectionList_mutex.unlock();

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Why tag std? Are your mutex std::mutex or something? –  Manoj R Dec 28 '12 at 11:36
    
yes the mutex and the thread are both c++11 std –  sh4kesbeer Dec 28 '12 at 11:38
    
ok, maybe i am stupid, but now (i crafted a little code) that works, i just have to figure out, why it does not work in context of my real program –  sh4kesbeer Dec 28 '12 at 11:50
2  
It probably won't help with your problem, but should consider using RAII wrappers (lock_guard or unique_lock) to lock the mutex, rather than locking and unlocking it by hand. That way, it won't be left locked forever if the block exits early or throws an exception. –  Mike Seymour Dec 28 '12 at 11:57
3  
@sh4kesbeer: They're standard C++11 classes, so they should be portable to anywhere you can use std::mutex itself. –  Mike Seymour Dec 28 '12 at 12:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My guess is that your ConnectionHandler object is being destroyed somewhere. Also, you have defined ConnectionHandler::start in a silly way.

First, ConnectionHandler::start should be defined this way:

void ConnectionHandler::start(ConnectionHandler * pThis){
    pThis->main();
}

The C++11 ::std::thread class is perfectly capable of preserving the type of the function argument so there is no need to resort to void *.

Secondly, add in this code:

void ConnectionHandler::~ConnectionHandler(){
    const void * const meptr = this;
    this->connectionList_mutex.lock();
    ::std::cout << "ConnectionHandler being destroyed at " << meptr << ::std::endl;
    this->connectionList_mutex.unlock();
}

And change the constructor to read:

ConnectionHandler::ConnectionHandler(){
    const void * const meptr = this;
    ::std::cout << "ConnectionHandler being created at " << meptr << ::std::endl;
    std::thread t(&this->start, this);
    t.detach();
}

This will show you when the ConnectionHandler object is being destroyed. And my guess is that your code is destroying it while your detached thread is still running.

The meptr thing is because operator << has an overload for void * that prints out the pointer value. Printing out the pointer value for this will allow you to match up calls to the constructor and destructor if you're creating multiple ConnectionHandler objects.

Edit: Since it turned out I was correct, here is how I would recommend you write the play ConnectionHandler class:

#include <iostream>
#include <atomic>
#include <thread>
#include <chrono>
#include <mutex>

class ConnectionHandler {
 public:
   ConnectionHandler();
   ~ConnectionHandler();
   ConnectionHandler(const ConnectionHandler &) = delete;
   const ConnectionHandler &operator =(const ConnectionHandler &) = delete;

   int addNewSocket();

 private:
   int main();
   static void start(ConnectionHandler * pThis);

   ::std::mutex connectionList_mutex;
   volatile ::std::atomic_bool thread_shutdown;
   ::std::thread thread;
};

ConnectionHandler::ConnectionHandler()
     : thread_shutdown(false), thread(&this->start, this)
{
}

ConnectionHandler::~ConnectionHandler()
{
   thread_shutdown.store(true);
   thread.join();
}

void ConnectionHandler::start(ConnectionHandler * pThis){
   pThis->main();
}

int ConnectionHandler::addNewSocket(){
   ::std::lock_guard< ::std::mutex> lock(connectionList_mutex);
   ::std::cout << "test1" << ::std::endl;

   return 0;
}

int ConnectionHandler::main(){
   while(!thread_shutdown.load()){
      ::std::lock_guard< ::std::mutex> lock(connectionList_mutex);
      ::std::cout << "test2" << ::std::endl;
      ::std::this_thread::sleep_for(::std::chrono::milliseconds(100));

   }
   return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
First: Thanks a lot, you guys here at stackoverflow are great! Hopefully someday i will have enough skill to help people, like you do. Second: Now that i know that the ConnectionHandler is destroyed right after it is created i am starting to investigate this, without your kind hint i would probably have just given up this project, because i have been trying to fix the error for a week now :) –  sh4kesbeer Dec 30 '12 at 12:20
    
Ok, i found the fault: I have created the ConnectionHandler within a function and as soon as the function ended the instance has been destroyed. In connection to thislink i have figured out, that i have to create a pointer that points to a handler created with the "new" operator (ConnectionHandler* newHandler = new ConnectionHandler;). In this case (as i unsterstood) the pointer is destroyed, but the instance of the ConnectionHandler stays in memory. Again: Thanks for your kind help! –  sh4kesbeer Dec 30 '12 at 12:37
    
@sh4kesbeer: That is still likely the wrong solution. You need to think about which thread 'owns' the ConnectionManager object. In this case, the only real choice is the detached thread since that thread needs the object as long as it lives and you have no way of shutting it down. This means you need to have a way to 'ask' the detached thread to destroy your object and shut itself down. Creating it with new sort of works, but it creates a memory leak and is overall a messy solution. –  Omnifarious Dec 30 '12 at 22:55
    
I do not understand what you mean, in context of the real project (not this minimal solution) the ConnectionHandler is created and owned by an Acceptor (Object) that processes incoming connections and disconnects. The plan (for now) is that this Acceptor will destroy and create the ConnectionHandlers dynamically as they are needed. I hope this works, concerning that the data can be accessed process wide and is not limited by threads. –  sh4kesbeer Dec 31 '12 at 17:39
    
@sh4kesbeer: If the ConnectionHandler is still creating a detached thread, you still need a way of notifying the detached thread that it should shut down and then join with it in the ConnectionHandler destructor. –  Omnifarious Jan 1 '13 at 18:07

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