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I have a MySQL table containing data for series of tests taken by athletes. I want to get the best results for each event.

Here is the table containing the data for all of the tests taken by the athletes:

+---------+-----------+-------+
| eventId | athleteId | score |
+---------+-----------+-------+
| 1       | 129907    | 900   |
| 2       | 129907    | 940   |
| 3       | 129907    | 927   |
| 4       | 129907    | 856   |
| 1       | 328992    | 780   |
| 2       | 328992    | 890   |
| 3       | 328992    | 936   |
| 4       | 328992    | 864   |
| 1       | 492561    | 899   |
| 2       | 492561    | 960   |
| 3       | 492561    | 840   |
| 4       | 492561    | 920   |
| 5       | 487422    | 900   |
| 6       | 487422    | 940   |
| 7       | 487422    | 927   |
| 5       | 629876    | 780   |
| 6       | 629876    | 890   |
| 7       | 629876    | 940   |
| 5       | 138688    | 899   |
| 6       | 138688    | 950   |
| 7       | 138688    | 840   |
+---------+-----------+-------+

I need to select the best standard lineup, taking the best tests. The result I am looking for should be:

+---------+-----------+-------+
| eventId | athleteId | score |
+---------+-----------+-------+
| 1       | 129907    | 900   |
| 2       | 492561    | 960   |
| 3       | 328992    | 936   |
| 4       | 492561    | 920   |
| 5       | 487422    | 900   |
| 6       | 138688    | 950   |
| 7       | 629876    | 940   |
+---------+-----------+-------+
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closed as not a real question by deceze, hakre, PeeHaa, Jocelyn, tereško Dec 28 '12 at 21:31

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you wanted to reliably get the winner (and joint winners). The following SQL statement should do it...

SELECT athleteId, a.eventId, a.score
FROM tests AS a
JOIN (
  -- This select finds the top score for each event
  SELECT eventId, MAX(score) AS score
  FROM tests 
  GROUP BY eventId
) AS b
-- Join on the top scores
ON a.eventId = b.eventId
AND a.score = b.score

I'm performing a sub-select to get the highest scores for each event and then performing an inner join to get the individual records that achieved the highest score in the event.


Additional information

I have compiled the following information from conversations in the comments.

Why is the basic group by solution not reliable?

SELECT athleteId, eventId, score
FROM (
  SELECT athleteId, eventId, score
  FROM tests
  ORDER BY eventId, score DESC
) AS a
GROUP BY eventId

We are creating a group from a recordset we have ordered on event and score. We are then selecting the value from the columns using grouping to select one record per event.

The first thing to note

If you are using a GROUP BY clause you are no longer talking about individual records but an unordered set of records!

You can use aggregate functions to do some pretty powerful and useful cross-record calculations in MySQL http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/group-by-functions.html but in order to relate the groups back to individual records you will likely need to perform a JOIN.

In the second example we are returning groups as if they were individual records.

Why does the second example appear to work?

Rather than in the SQL language non-aggregated columns are illegal, in MySQL they have been allowed, although I can't say why, it could be for performance reasons in denormalized columns or where for some reason you are certain that the value for the column in a group does not change.

MySQL selects the easiest value to return for the non-aggregated column in a group. It happens to select the first value it encounters as a result of the ordering of the recordset before it was grouped, however, it will not necessarily do this all of the time!

MySQL documentation states that the values for non-aggregated columns in a select containing a GROUP BY are indeterminate. This means that the resulting values for non-aggregated columns should not be assumed to be a result of events prior to grouping (i.e. any ordering in the recordset), although practically in this current implementation it appears that way.

In future version it may not be the case, it may not even be the case that the result may not even be the same if you run it twice. The fact it is documented explicitly is reason enough for me to avoid it!

Why are non-aggregated columns indeterminate?

I would deduce that they intend to leave the implementation of algos for grouping open for future optimization which may ignore or break the original ordering of the records prior to grouping.

Conceptually it makes sense if you imagine a group of records as a single unit rather than a collection of individual records. For a non-aggregate column there are a number of possible values that can be returned and no implied conditions to choose one over the other at that point of selection, you have to remember the way the records were before grouping.

The risk

All of my queries using this approach may start acting up at some point. They might return values for a record that did not obtain the highest score for the event.

Also, this bug wont be immediately apparent so tracking the cause to the recent upgrade of MySQL will take a while. I can also guarantee I will have forgotten about this potential pitfall, where all of the places this was a problem when it does happen and so I will likely end up stuck on an older less secure version of MySQL until I get the chance to debug it properly... etc... Painful...

Why does the join solution differ?

The sub select in the JOIN statement does not use non-aggregated columns, aggregations are determinate as they relate to the group as a whole rather than individual records. Regardless of the order of the records before they were grouped the answer will always be the same.

I have used a JOIN statement to relate the groups back to the individual records we are interested in. In some cases it may mean that I have more than one individual record for each group. For example, when it comes to a draws where two athletes have the same highest score I will either have to return both records or arbitrarily pick one. I'm fairly confident that we will want all of the highest scorers so I haven't provided any rules to select between two athletes that may draw.


Picking one record as the winner

In order to pick one record as the clear winner we need a way of being able to tell apart the winner from the runners up. We might pick the ultimate winner as the first athlete to get the highest score, for another athlete to jump into the lead they must better the previous score set.

To do this we must have a way of determining the sequence of the tests so we introduce a testId column which will be incremented with each new result we get. When we have this we can then perform the following query...

SELECT a.eventId, athleteId, a.score
FROM tests AS a
JOIN (
  -- This select finds the first testId for each score + event combination
  SELECT MIN(testId) AS testId, c.eventId, c.score
  FROM tests AS c
  JOIN (
    -- This select finds the top score for each event
    SELECT eventId, MAX(score) AS score
    FROM tests
    GROUP BY eventId
  ) AS d
  ON c.eventId = d.eventId
  AND c.score = d.score
  GROUP BY eventId, score
) AS b
ON a.testId = b.testId

What happens here is that we create groups representing the highest score for each event we then inner join that with groups that represent the lowest testId for each score and event combination and finally inner join that with the records in the test table to get the individual records.

This can also be written (with a slightly different execution plan) as follows.

SELECT a.eventId, athleteId, a.score
FROM tests AS a
JOIN (
  -- This select finds the top score for each event
  SELECT eventId, MAX(score) AS score
  FROM tests
  GROUP BY eventId
) AS b
ON a.eventId = b.eventId
AND a.score = b.score
JOIN (
  -- This select finds the first testId for each score + event combination
  SELECT MIN(testId) AS testId, eventId, score
  FROM tests
  GROUP BY eventId, score
) AS c
ON a.testId = c.testId

The basic group by solution achieves the same result in less SQL but it optimizes very poorly in comparison. If we add indexes to our tables the basic group by solution doesn't utilize the indexes and requires two filesorts (additional runs through the table to put it into order) on all of the records in the tests table. However, the original nested sub-select query above optimizes very well.

share|improve this answer
    
"Unknown column 'b.score' in 'on clause'" –  djpredator17 Dec 28 '12 at 12:03
    
Oh whoops, thanks for pointing that out missed the column alias, I've updated the answer –  Stuart Wakefield Dec 28 '12 at 12:05
    
That one is ok, thanks! –  djpredator17 Dec 28 '12 at 12:07
    
Mismatch with "output should be" from question in: 6 138688 950 instead of 6 492561 950. –  hakre Dec 28 '12 at 12:13
    
Yes there is a mismatch with the input and the expected output in the OP, SQL doesn't lie... –  Stuart Wakefield Dec 28 '12 at 12:23

Try this one:

SELECT t1.eventId, t1.athleteId, t1.score  
FROM tests t1 
LEFT JOIN tests t2 ON t2.eventId = t1.eventId AND t2.score > t1.score 
WHERE t2.athleteId IS NULL
ORDER BY t1.eventId 

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/80e34/3/0

share|improve this answer
    
t1 and t2? This outputs an error... –  djpredator17 Dec 28 '12 at 11:59
    
It works for me sqlfiddle.com/#!2/80e34/3/0 –  piotrekkr Dec 28 '12 at 12:35

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