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I have a 12 byte packet to be sent of the form:

+--------+------+
| ID     | ver  |
+--------+------+

ID is 8 bytes and ver is 4 bytes. I have declared a struct as below but my PC gives me a size value of 16 bytes (8 + 4 + 4 byte of padding). #pragma solved the problem, but is there any way to solve the issue?

struct pak
{
  char *ID;
  uint32_t ver;
};
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1  
What is there to "solve" at this point? –  Sean Bright Dec 28 '12 at 11:39
    
You said #pragma solved the problem.. Then what is there to solve? –  Krishnabhadra Dec 28 '12 at 11:40
5  
@lbonn right, but I sugest char[8] - since the pointer will be useless regardles of the target machinge pointer size :-) –  Mario The Spoon Dec 28 '12 at 11:45
1  
The size of char* ID is 4 bytes, why are you counting it as 8? –  Adeel Ahmed Dec 28 '12 at 11:47
2  
Is anyone else remotely disturbed by the fact that the structure he's about to send (packed or not) contains a char* pointer and not the bytes referenced by it therein ? –  WhozCraig Dec 28 '12 at 12:14

3 Answers 3

The most generic, portable and error-proof solution is to don't care about padding at all.

Instead of sending the structure as it is, you can serialize and deserialize structure to a character array using, for example, memcpy.

You should not forget about the endianness when sending data to the other device - see documentation for ntohl and ntohs for details.

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I'm sorry,how to serialize and desrialize the structure? Can you please give a example. Thanks –  foo_l Dec 28 '12 at 12:14
    
@foo_l One simple way is to do an union of the structure and of an array of bytes. –  PhiLho Dec 28 '12 at 12:38
    
@foo_l When I wrote "using for example memcpy", I meant calling memcpy(&buffer[0], val, sizeof(val)); where val is the field of the structure and buffer is an array large enough to contain the structure. For fields you increment the index in &buffer[0] by sizeof(val). –  Rafał Rawicki Dec 28 '12 at 13:15
struct pak
{
  char *ID;
  uint32_t ver;
}__attribute__((packed));

Use above for no extra padding..

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looks like your platform align structure on 8byte boundary. gcc has option to change this. if you wish to pack on 4byte boundary compile with -fpack-struct=4 option enabled. but be careful it may slow down memory allocation. (for more detail see gcc manual)

If you are not writing platform dependent code instead of using char pointer you may go for uint64_t. Remember, 32bit platform will give you 4byte pointer.

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