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`Obtain the stride (the number of bytes between pixels on different rows)

screen_get_buffer_property_iv(mScreenPixelBuffer, SCREEN_PROPERTY_STRIDE, &mStride)`

I don't understand what the first line meant about having bytes between pixels on different rows. The function is what the stride is obtained through.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If we have a rectangular bunch of pixels (a screen, bitmap, or some such), there must be a way for a program to calculate the position of a pixel. Lets call this sort of bunch of pixels a "surface".

The surface can be split into individual pixels, and we could just put then in a very long row and number then from 0 to some large number (e.g. a 1280 x 1024 screen would have 1310720 pixels). But if you show this long row of pixels on a screen, it makes more sense to talk about lines of pixels that are 1280 pixels long, and have 1024 rows of them.

Now, let's say we want to draw a line from pixels 100,100 to 100,200. We can easily write that as:

int i; for(i = 100; i < 200; i++) { setpixel(surface, 100, 100+i, colour); }

Now, if we want to implement setpixel, what do we need to do? One thing would be to translate our x, y coordinates (100, 100+i) into a location of our "long row of pixels".

The general formula tends to be (x + y * width) * bytes_per_pixel. So if we have a 32bpp image (four bytes per pixel), that would make (100 + (100+i) * 1280) * 4

However, to make it easier to design the graphics chip there are often limits on things like "the width of a surface must be an even multiple of X", where X is usually 16, 32, 64 or some other power of 2. Sometimes, it has to be a power of two directly (for example textures in early opengl can only be 2^n x 2^n pixels in size - you don't have to USE the entire texture). And this is where stride comes in.

Say we want to have a bitmap of 100 x 100 pixels. But the graphics chip that we use to draw the bitmap to the screen has a rule that you MUST have a even multiple of 32 pixels wide surfaces. So we make something like this

XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...
XXXXXXXXXX...

The X's here represent the actual pixels (10 per X) in our bitmap, and the ... 28 pixels of "waste" that we have to have to make the graphics chip happy.

Now the formula of using width doesn't work, because from the software creating the bitmap, the width is 100 pixels. We need to change the math to make up for the "extra space at the end of each row of pixels":

(x + y * stride) * bytes_per_pixel

Now, the stride is 128, but the width is 100 pixels.

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Wow really really nice explanation. Thanks a lot :) –  Tahlil Dec 29 '12 at 5:49

Stride here refers to array stride, the number of bytes between memory locations that correspond to the beginning of adjacent rows of an array, in this case of pixels.

In a fully packed array, the stride equals the size of an individual pixel multiplied with the number of pixels in the row. For performance reasons, arrays are frequently aligned so that each row takes a "round" number of bytes, typically an exponent of two. The byte size of the row, aka the stride, cannot be computed from other array parameters and must be known in order to correctly calculate the memory position of an arbitrary pixel.

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