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I have a simple program where I write 6 of 7 numbers to a text file. Logically everything seems to be fine.

However the numbers are not written to the file as expected.

Random random = new Random();

Console.WriteLine("Please enter the name of the numbers file");
string fileLotto = Console.ReadLine();
//creating the lotto file
FileStream fs = new FileStream("../../" + fileLotto + ".txt", FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Write);
BufferedStream bs = new BufferedStream(fs);
Console.WriteLine("File created");
fs.Close();
StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("../.." + fileLotto + ".txt");

for(int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 7; j++)
    {
        //Console.Write(random.Next(1, 49));
        sw.Write(random.Next(1, 49) + " " );

    }
    sw.WriteLine();

}
sw.Close();

The file was created, however no numbers were written to the file...advice perhaps as to why?

share|improve this question
1  
Works for me. It's not pleasant code, but it works... –  Jon Skeet Dec 28 '12 at 12:35
1  
Why do you have a BufferedStream that you are not using? –  Oded Dec 28 '12 at 12:35
    
You're calling fs.Close(); but not fs.Dispose();. –  Candide Dec 28 '12 at 12:44
    
I get it now...there was a small mistake in the syntax... –  Arianule Dec 28 '12 at 12:53
    
StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("../.." + fileLotto + .txt"); –  Arianule Dec 28 '12 at 12:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Note that your code is not optimized and has a lot of unnecessary streams and buffers being created but the answer by @Michael outlines the right code to use in it's place. My answer will just highlight why your code wasn't working in the intended way.

The answer to your question is actually very simple.

StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("../.." + fileLotto + ".txt");

You have forgotten to add the / in the string to ../... If fileLotto is assumed to have the value example then the FileStream will create the file example.txt but the StreamWriter will access ..example.txt for writing and that too in a different folder.

Use variables to define values that have to be repeated used. Remember the DRY principle.

Random random = new Random();

Console.WriteLine("Please enter the name of the numbers file");
string fileLotto = Console.ReadLine();
string fileName = "../../" + fileLotto + ".txt";
//creating the lotto file
FileStream fs = new FileStream(fileName, FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Write);
Console.WriteLine("File created");
fs.Close();

StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(fileName);

for(int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 7; j++)
    {
        //Console.Write(random.Next(1, 49));
        sw.Write(random.Next(1, 49) + " " );

    }
    Console.WriteLine();

}
sw.Close();

Again I say please use @Michael's code. This is just to highlight the primary issue with your code.

share|improve this answer

Well I have to admit that this is not a fancy code. But for why this is not working is this
In this line

FileStream fs = new FileStream("../../" + fileLotto + ".txt", FileMode.OpenOrCreate, FileAccess.Write);

You are opening file in "../../" folder which is two up folder of executable file.
But in this line

StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("../.." + fileLotto + ".txt");

Same parameter is "../.." which causes another file to be opened parent folder of executable with ".." in the beginnig of file name. You have add an extra '/' at the end of StreamWriter parameter to ensure you are writing the first file you created using FileStream.

share|improve this answer

What are you trying to do? Whay you declare so many streams for nothing? Just use:

using(StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter("../.." + fileLotto + ".txt")){
    for(int i = 0; i < 6; i++){
        for(int j = 0; j < 7; j++)
        {
            //Console.Write(random.Next(1, 49));
            sw.Write(random.Next(1, 49) + " " );

    }
    Console.WriteLine();
    }
}

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/6ka1wd3w.aspx

share|improve this answer

Let's simplify this:

Random random = new Random();
Console.WriteLine("Please enter the name of the numbers file");
string fileLotto = Console.ReadLine();

StringBuilder text = new StringBuilder();
for(int i = 0; i < 6; i++)
{
    for(int j = 0; j < 7; j++)
    {
        text.Append(random.Next(1, 49) + " " );
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
}

File.WriteAllText(string.Format("../../{0}.txt", fileLotto), text.ToString());

This code is also safer. You're not opening a bunch of streams (that you aren't closing BTW) that are unnecessary. Rather you are getting all of the text together and writing it all at once.

share|improve this answer
    
Simplify it you may have, answer the question you did not. –  Oded Dec 28 '12 at 12:39
    
@Oded, does not this code work (unlike the OP's) and at the same time simplify and add a layer of safety because there's not a ridiculous number of random streams open that aren't getting close either? –  Michael Perrenoud Dec 28 '12 at 12:41
    
Did you not see the comment by Jon Skeet - the code by the OP does work for him. And the question was why doesn't their code work, not how to make it simpler. –  Oded Dec 28 '12 at 12:41
    
@Oded, I'm confused a bit. Many times (as I'm sure you would agree) the process of getting code to work is a process of refactoring and learning new things. Better ways of doing the same thing. Yes? Is that not considered an answer to a question? Also, I just saw Jon's comment, but it's clearly not working for the OP, and likely because the OP isn't flushing, but the fact is the code they have is unstable yes? So shouldn't they use a better way? –  Michael Perrenoud Dec 28 '12 at 12:44
    
Sure, but when someone asks why is X not working, they want to know why X is not working, not to see Y that is. –  Oded Dec 28 '12 at 12:45

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