Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have a vector declared like this:

struct MYSTRUCT
{
 float a;
 float b;
};

std::vector<MYSTRUCT> v;

Now, I want to find all elements of v that share the same a, and average their b, i.e.

Say v contains these five elements {a, b}: {1, 1}, {1, 2}, {2, 1}, {1, 3}, {2, 2}

I want to get v[0], v[1], v[3] (where a is 1) and average b: (1 + 2 + 3)/3 = 2, and v[2] and v[4] (where a is 2) and average b: (1+2)/2 = 1.5

Afterwards v will look like this: {1, 2}, {1, 2}, {2, 1.5}, {1, 2}, {2, 1.5}

I'm not really familiar with STL or Boost so I can only figure out how to do this the "bruteforce" way in C++, but I'm guessing that the STL (for_each?) and Boost (lambda?) libraries can solve this more elegantly.

EDIT Just for reference, here's my (working) brute force way to do it:

for(int j = 0; j < tempV.size(); j++)
{
    MYSTRUCT v = tempV.at(j);
    int matchesFound = 0;

    for(int k = 0; k < tempV.size(); k++)
    {
    	if(k != j && v.a == tempV.at(k).a)
    	{
    		v.b += tempV.at(k).b;
    		matchesFound++;
    	}
    }

    if(matchesFound > 0)
    {
    	v.b = v.b/matchesFound;
    }

    finalV.push_back(v);
}
share|improve this question
    
Be careful comparing floats for equality! Compare with epsilon: cygnus-software.com/papers/comparingfloats/comparingfloats.htm –  Emile Cormier Jan 13 '10 at 9:23
add comment

9 Answers 9

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just thinking aloud, this may end up fairly silly:

struct Average {
    Average() : total(0), count(0) {}
    operator float() const { return total / count; }
    Average &operator+=(float f) {
        total += f;
        ++count;
    }
    float total;
    int count;
};

struct Counter {
    Counter (std::map<int, Average> &m) : averages(&m) {}
    Counter operator+(const MYSTRUCT &s) {
         (*averages)[s.a] += s.b;
         return *this;
    }
    std::map<int, Average> *averages;
};

std::map<int, Average> averages;
std::accumulate(v.begin(), v.end(), Counter(averages));
BOOST_FOREACH(MYSTRUCT &s, v) {
    s.b = averages[s.a];
}

Hmm. Not completely silly, but perhaps not compelling either...

share|improve this answer
1  
I kinda like that one, but then I'm a sucker for stuff implemented with fold and closures =) –  me22 Sep 10 '09 at 19:30
    
I just noticed that Average class is horrid: you can add two of them together and get something completely meaningless. Still, it isn't supposed to be for general-purpose reasoning with averages. –  Steve Jessop Sep 10 '09 at 19:36
    
True, I'd definitely get rid of the operator float(). But apart from that, it seems fine –  jalf Sep 10 '09 at 23:26
add comment

Sketch of a solution:

sort(v.begin(), v.end());
vector<MYSTRUCT>::iterator b = v.begin(), e = v.end();
while (b != e) {
    vector<MYSTRUCT>::iterator m = find_if(b, e, bind(&MYSTRUCT::a, _1) != b->a);
    float x = accumulate(b, m, 0.f, _1 + bind(&MYSTRUCT::b,_2)) / (m-b);
    for_each(b, m, bind(&MYSTRUCT::a, _1) = x);
    b = m;
}

It's not a great one, though, since it's not exactly what was asked for (thanks to the sort), and still doesn't really feel clean to me. I think that some filter_iterators and transform_iterators or something could possibly give a much more functional-style answer.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain why you think it is not a great solution? –  fbrereto Sep 10 '09 at 18:56
1  
@fbrereto, as @me22 says, the main issue is that it changes v's order (by sorting), so it can't provide the exact result requested (where v's order was lengt intact). –  Alex Martelli Sep 10 '09 at 19:14
    
std::find_if doesn't require a sorted sequence ( sgi.com/tech/stl/find_if.html ). Neither does std::find. –  Max Lybbert Sep 10 '09 at 21:55
    
@Max: I'm sorting so that identical MYSTRUCT::a's are adjacent, letting me run the accumulate. –  me22 Sep 11 '09 at 2:23
    
Ahh. Thanks. I missed the accumulate. –  Max Lybbert Sep 11 '09 at 20:00
show 1 more comment

Another approach, this one not in-place, though I think it's time-complexity-wise asymptotically the same.

typedef map<float, vector<float>> map_type;
map_type m;
BOOST_FOREACH(MYSTRUCT const &s, v) {
    m[s.a].push_back(s.b);
}
BOOST_FOREACH(map_type::reference p, m) {
    float x = accumulate(p.second.begin(), p.second.end(), 0.0f) / p.second.size();
    p.second.assign(1, x);
}
BOOST_FOREACH(MYSTRUCT &s, v) {
    s.b = m[s.a].front();
}

Again, though, it's just a slightly elegant way to code the brute-force solution, not a nice functional-style way.

share|improve this answer
    
functional code, by definition, doesn't modify existing data structures, and here the problem specs are exactly to modify the existing data structure, so I think this code is fine. –  Alex Martelli Sep 10 '09 at 19:18
add comment

Perhaps a brute force approach?...

struct MYAVG
{
    int count;
    float avg;  
};

// first pass - calculate averages
for ( vector < MYSTRUCT >::iterator first = v.begin(); 
      first != v.end(); ++first )
{
    MYAVG myAvg;
    myAvg.count = 1;
    myAvg.avg = first->b;

    if ( mapAvg.find( first->a ) == mapAvg.end() )
        mapAvg[ first->a ] = myAvg;
    else
    {
        mapAvg[ first->a ].count++;
        mapAvg[ first->a ].avg = 
            ( ( mapAvg[ first->a ].avg * ( mapAvg[ first->a ].count - 1 ) ) 
                + myAvg.avg ) / mapAvg[ first->a ].count;
    }
}

// second pass - update average values
for ( vector < MYSTRUCT >::iterator second = v.begin(); 
      second != v.end(); ++second )
    second->b = mapAvg[ second->a ].avg;

I've tested this with the values you've supplied and get the required vector - It's not exactly optimal, but I think it's quite easy to follow (might be more preferable to a complex algorithm).

share|improve this answer
add comment

Avoid C-style! It's not what C++ is designed for. I'd like to emphasize clarity and readability.

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <numeric>
#include <vector>

#include <boost/assign/list_of.hpp>

using namespace std;
using namespace boost::assign;

struct mystruct
{
  mystruct(float a, float b)
    : a(a), b(b)
  { }

  float a;
  float b;
};

vector <mystruct> v =
  list_of ( mystruct(1, 1) ) (1, 2) (2, 1) (1, 3) (2, 2);

ostream& operator<<(
  ostream& out, mystruct const& data)
{
  out << "{" << data.a << ", " << data.b << "}";
  return out;
}

ostream& operator<<(
  ostream& out, vector <mystruct> const& v)
{
  copy(v.begin(), v.end(),
       ostream_iterator <mystruct> (out, " "));
  return out;
}

struct average_b
{
  map <float, float> sum;
  map <float, int> count;

  float operator[] (float a) const
  {
    return sum.find(a)->second / count.find(a)->second;
  }
};

average_b operator+ (
  average_b const& average,
  mystruct const& s)
{
  average_b result( average );

  result.sum[s.a] += s.b;
  ++result.count[s.a];

  return result;
}

struct set_b_to_average
{
  set_b_to_average(average_b const& average)
    : average(average)
  { }

  mystruct operator()(mystruct const& s) const
  {
    return mystruct(s.a, average[s.a]);
  }

  average_b const& average;
};

int main()
{
  cout << "before:" << endl << v << endl << endl;

  transform(v.begin(), v.end(),
            v.begin(), set_b_to_average(
              accumulate(v.begin(), v.end(), average_b())
            ));

  cout << "after:" << endl << v << endl << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use the "partition" algorithm along with "accumulate."

Example

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <numeric>

struct test
{
    float a;
    float b;

    test(const float one, const float two)
    	: a(one), b(two)
    {
    }
};

struct get_test_a {
    float interesting;

    get_test_a(const float i)
    	: interesting(i)
    {
    }

    bool operator()(const test &value) const
    {
    	static const float epi = 1e-6;
    	return value.a < interesting + epi &&
    		value.a > interesting - epi;
    }
};

struct add_test_b {
    float operator()(const float init, const test &value) const
    {
    	return init + value.b;
    }
};

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    using std::partition;
    using std::accumulate;
    using std::distance;
    typedef std::vector<test> container;

    container myContainer;

    // Say 'myVector' contains these five elements {a, b}:
    // {1, 1}, {1, 2}, {2, 1}, {1, 3}, {2, 2}
    myContainer.push_back(test(1, 1));
    myContainer.push_back(test(1, 2));
    myContainer.push_back(test(2, 1));
    myContainer.push_back(test(1, 3));
    myContainer.push_back(test(2, 2));

    // I want to get v[0], v[1], v[3] (where a is 1) and
    // average b: (1 + 2 + 3)/3 = 2,
    // and v[2] and v[4] (where a is 2) and average b: (1+2)/2 = 1.5
    const container::iterator split = 
    	partition(myContainer.begin(), myContainer.end(),
    			  get_test_a(1));

    const float avg_of_one =
    	accumulate(myContainer.begin(), split, 0.0f, add_test_b())
    	/ distance(myContainer.begin(), split);

    const float avg_of_others =
    	accumulate(split, myContainer.end(), 0.0f, add_test_b())
    	/ distance(split, myContainer.end());

    std::cout << "The 'b' average of test values where a = 1 is "
    		  << avg_of_one << std::endl;

    std::cout << "The 'b' average of the remaining test values is "
    		  << avg_of_others << std::endl;

    return 0;
}


Documentation from the gcc headers

  /**
   *  @brief Move elements for which a predicate is true to the beginning
   *         of a sequence.
   *  @ingroup mutating_algorithms
   *  @param  first   A forward iterator.
   *  @param  last    A forward iterator.
   *  @param  pred    A predicate functor.
   *  @return  An iterator @p middle such that @p pred(i) is true for each
   *  iterator @p i in the range @p [first,middle) and false for each @p i
   *  in the range @p [middle,last).
   *
   *  @p pred must not modify its operand. @p partition() does not preserve
   *  the relative ordering of elements in each group, use
   *  @p stable_partition() if this is needed.
  */
  template<typename _ForwardIterator, typename _Predicate>
    inline _ForwardIterator
    partition(_ForwardIterator __first, _ForwardIterator __last,
          _Predicate   __pred)

  /**
   *  @brief  Accumulate values in a range with operation.
   *
   *  Accumulates the values in the range [first,last) using the function
   *  object @a binary_op.  The initial value is @a init.  The values are
   *  processed in order.
   *
   *  @param  first  Start of range.
   *  @param  last  End of range.
   *  @param  init  Starting value to add other values to.
   *  @param  binary_op  Function object to accumulate with.
   *  @return  The final sum.
   */
  template<typename _InputIterator, typename _Tp, typename _BinaryOperation>
    inline _Tp
    accumulate(_InputIterator __first, _InputIterator __last, _Tp __init,
           _BinaryOperation __binary_op)
share|improve this answer
add comment

It seems the easiest way is to run a moderately complex functor over the colelction:

struct CountAllAverages {
    typedef std::pair<float, unsigned> average_t;
    std::map<float, average_t> averages;
    void operator()(mystruct& ms) {
        average_t& average = averages[ms.a];
        average.second++;
        average.first += ms.b;
    }
    float getAverage(float a) { return averages[a].first/averages[a].second; }
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

Writing C++, you should maintain balance between reusability (e.g. reuse existing algorithms and data structures) and readability. onebyone was close, but his solution can be further improved:

template<class T>
struct average {
  T total;
  int count;
  mutable bool calculated;
  mutable T average_value;

  average & operator+=(T const & value) {
    total += value;
    ++count;
    calculated = false;
  }

  T value() const {
    if(!calculated) {
      calculated = true;
      average_value = total / count;
    }
    return average_value;
  }
};


std::map< float, average<float> > averages;
BOOST_FOREACH(MYSTRUCT &element, v) {
  averages[element.a] += element.b;
}

BOOST_FOREACH(MYSTRUCT &element, v) {
  element.b = averages[element.a].value();
}

Bonus points for having reusable "average" type.

share|improve this answer
add comment
struct MYSTRUCT { 
    float x;
    float y;

    operator float() const { return y; }
};

class cmp { 
    float val;
public:
    cmp(float v) : val(v) {}      
    bool operator()(MYSTRUCT const &a) { return a.x != val; }
};

float masked_mean(std::vector<MYSTRUCT> const &in, MYSTRUCT const &mask) { 
    std::vector<float> temp;
    std::remove_copy_if(in.begin(), in.end(), std::back_inserter(temp), cmp(mask.x));
    return std::accumulate(temp.begin(), temp.end(), 0.0f) / temp.size();
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.