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I am trying to write a loadable device driver.. which is capable to act on external event. please clarify following points.

1> modprob command is used to add remove modules to kernel. Does it applies to static modules ? can modprobe or rmmod --- remove static module of linux kernel.

2> If interrupt comes i will save data & schedule the bottom half. Now when the bottom half completes its task how shall i inform application at user space that data is available.

3> I am thinking to use entry in debugfs to transfer data between application & driver. So is it feasible that my device driver & my user space application -- by using MAP() system call map same area of an file in debufs & exchange data between each other ?

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modprob command is used to add remove modules to kernel. Does it applies to static modules ? can modprobe or rmmod --- remove static module of linux kernel.

If you mean by static module = a module that is compiled as part of the linux kernel (and not as a separate loadable module) then the answer is; no you cannot.

If interrupt comes i will save data & schedule the bottom half. Now when the bottom half completes its task how shall i inform application at user space that data is available.

If the user space app runs in polling mode, you can notify it by ioctl, or sysfs/procfs file. but if the user space app need to be notified in event-driver manner, then use netlink socket.

I am thinking to use entry in debugfs to transfer data between application & driver. So is it feasible that my device driver & my user space application -- by using MAP() system call map same area of an file in debufs & exchange data between each other ?

the way a user space app read/writes debugfs is by simply reading/writing the debugfs file (it's under /proc/.. or /sys/.., so you can "open" the file, get the file descriptor, then read/write - as if it was a regular file).

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thanks for your clear reply.. Just to add to /sysfs --- what do we mean by sysfs one value per file ? Does it means it can have only one int, or one char or one struct inside it ? –  user1871987 Dec 29 '12 at 7:08
    
sysfs files can have much more than single value. Each sysfs file is tight to a show/store functions (depends on the permissions of the file, if it's read only, it won't have store function). The read function is in the kernel space, and it populates the content of the sysfs it is responsible for, this can be any text you wish to show, not necessarily a single value. You can read more about sysfs api here: kernel.org/doc/Documentation/filesystems/sysfs.txt –  LIUB Dec 29 '12 at 10:08
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