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breaking/exit nested for in vb.net

Is GOTO the only way to exit from a double ForEach?

For Each city in cities
  For Each person in city.People
    If IsOK(person) GOTO Found_
  Next person
Next city

Found_: 
' ...

The question is for VB.NET, but wondering also for C#...

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10  
Return is a pretty good way to exit multiple levels of loop also. Sometimes that requires splitting your function so that the loops are in a helper function, but that's usually an improvement to the structure anyway. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 14:45
    
I don't want to Return, return fill exit the function! –  serhio Dec 28 '12 at 14:46
5  
@serhio: Right now your function does 2 things: It searches for a person, and it does something with the found person. That's a violation of the Single Responsibility Principle, and it splits up nicely into a helper function doing the search (and using Return) and a caller that invokes the search helper and then processes the result. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 14:47
    
if in this C# is similar to Java, a break with a label should work and is nicer than a goto, see here: stackoverflow.com/a/886979/559144 have not tested it... –  Davide Piras Dec 28 '12 at 14:47
1  
@DJKRAZE: The OP is asking for alternatives to GOTO –  Rui Jarimba Dec 28 '12 at 14:52
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marked as duplicate by Cyril Gandon, Kate Gregory, petert, Brian Mains, Eric J. Jan 2 '13 at 17:29

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

8 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

As Heinzi answered in this question:

Unfortunately, there's no exit two levels of for statement, but there are a few workarounds to avoid Goto, which is considered to be bad practice:

  • Dummy outer block

    Do
        For Each item In itemList
            For Each item1 In itemList1
                If item1.Text = "bla bla bla" Then
                    Exit Do
                End If
            Next
        Next
    Loop While False
    

    or

    Try
        For Each item In itemlist
            For Each item1 In itemlist1
                If item1 = "bla bla bla" Then
                    Exit Try
                End If
            Next
        Next
    Finally
    End Try
    
  • Separate function: Put the loops inside a separate function, which can be exited with return. This might require you to pass a lot of parameters, though, depending on how many local variables you use inside the loop. An alternative would be to put the block into a multi-line lambda, since this will create a closure over the local variables.

  • Boolean variable: This might make your code a bit less readable, depending on how many layers of nested loops you have:

    Dim done = False
    
    For Each item In itemList
        For Each item1 In itemList1
            If item1.Text = "bla bla bla" Then
                done = True
                Exit For
            End If
        Next
        If done Then Exit For
    Next
    
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+2 bad practices: GOTO and Throw Catch + LINQ –  serhio Dec 28 '12 at 15:28
1  
+1 good answer. But you forget the possibilty to use closures, which makes a "separate" function unnessecary. –  igrimpe Dec 28 '12 at 16:48
1  
Why would you use the Dummy Outer Block technique if it's the same as Goto, but longer and uglier?? Goto is bad practice, but this is even worse. But anyway, the best thing to do is to split into two functions. –  Meta-Knight Dec 28 '12 at 16:53
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put it in separate function

  Private Function FindPerson(cities As List(of City)) As Person
     For Each city in cities
        For Each person in city.People
           If IsOK(person) Return person
        Next person
     Next city
     Return Nothing
  End Function

and...

  Private Function ContainsPerson(cities As List(of City)) As Bool  
     For Each city in cities
        For Each person in city.People
           If IsOK(person) Return True
        Next person
     Next city
     Return False
  End Function

EDIT: Fixed VB syntax

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what my comment was leading toward. +1 –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 14:50
    
Yes - read your comment after submitting my post... SRP comment is on target too. –  Charles Bretana Dec 28 '12 at 14:52
1  
Thanks, I understand, but as I understand, the GOTO or a boolean flag is the only way to go out of a double for –  serhio Dec 28 '12 at 14:57
4  
Am I the only one that thinks this should be converted into a LINQ function? –  m-y Dec 28 '12 at 14:57
1  
m-y, you have my permission to do so... add it to the answer (if you don't have edit rights stick it in comment and I will move it... And thanks to JoelFan for editing answer to correct VB syntax, I appreciate! –  Charles Bretana Dec 28 '12 at 15:01
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Why not just use LINQ?

C#:

// Or use SingleOrDefault(...) if there can ever only be one.
var person = Cities.SelectMany(city => city.People)
                   .FirstOrDefault(person => IsOK(person));

if (person != null)
{
    ...
}

VB.Net (my best attempt, I'm not as verbosed in it):

// Or use SingleOrDefault(...) if there can ever only be one.
Dim person = Cities.SelectMany(Function(city) city.People)
                   .FirstOrDefault(Function(person) IsOK(person));

If person Not Nothing Then
    ...
End If

If all you are trying to do is see if there are any IsOK(person), then use the Any(...) extension method instead:

C#:

var isOK = Cities.SelectMany(city => city.People)
                 .Any(person => IsOK(person));

VB.Net (my best attempt, I'm not as verbosed in it):

Dim isOK = Cities.SelectMany(Function(city) city.People)
                 .Any(Function(person) IsOK(person));
share|improve this answer
    
It looks like he doesn't need that first person, just knowing if there is a person that IsOK, so Any would be appropriate instead of FirstOrDefault. The primary advantage, other than semantically stating what you mean, would be that it could handle null values in the sequence without generating a possible false positive. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 15:18
    
Ah, I thought he was trying to get the value, not just a true/false. I'll adjust my answer for that. –  m-y Dec 28 '12 at 15:20
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You could put a bool in the first loop and set it to false in the inner loop then break. Then in the outer loop break if the bool is false.

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You can also throw an exception:

Try
  For Each city in cities
    For Each person in city.People
      If IsOK(person) Throw New FoundException
    Next person
  Next city
Catch ex As FoundException
  DoFoundStuff
End Try

Caveat: My point is just to show that exceptions are an option for exiting multiple nested loops, not that it's appropriate in the particular case of this code example. In particular, exceptions should generally be limited to "exceptional/error" conditions not to "normal" conditions. For example, if you simply changed the "If" to "If Not IsOK ....", the exception may be the right solution.

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2  
That's true, but it's really bad style. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 14:48
4  
Using exceptions for non-exceptional state and/or regular control flow is a very bad practice. –  Honza Brestan Dec 28 '12 at 14:48
    
I didn't say it was good style but it is another way... why the hate? Also the OP did not limit to just non-exceptional situations... he just said how do you exit a nested loop without goto... sometimes an exception is the right choice for that –  JoelFan Dec 28 '12 at 14:49
1  
@JoelFan I think acknowledging this is poor style in the answer itself if this is a non-exceptional event, it might help with the downvoters. It is certainly a valid solution and depending on the use case, might be a good solution –  psubsee2003 Dec 28 '12 at 14:53
    
FoundException does not exist ))) so I will not create a new exception only for that –  serhio Dec 28 '12 at 14:59
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Add a boolean and set it to true when the person is found and break from the inner loop. then check if found is true. If so then break from the outer loop.

bool found;
For Each city in cities
    For Each person in city.People
        If IsOK(person) 
            found = true
            Exit For
        End If
    Next person
    If (found) 
        Exit For
    End If
 Next city
share|improve this answer
    
I think the VB.NET syntax is Exit For, not break. At least that's what VB6 used. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 14:51
    
It's been a long time since i wrote VB.NET! –  mosca125 Dec 28 '12 at 14:52
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Has been ages writing vb.net but the following should work (me thinks)

    Dim found As Boolean
    For Each city In cities
        If found = True Then
            Exit For
        End If
        For Each person In city.People

            If IsOK(person) Then
                found = True
                Exit For
            End If
        Next person
    Next city
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, as I understand, the GOTO or a boolean flag are the only way to go out of a double for –  serhio Dec 28 '12 at 15:01
    
I think so and by my own experience you'd better leave the GOTO alone –  Ralf de Kleine Dec 28 '12 at 15:03
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In addition to 888's answer: An extra function does not necessarily need params to be passed:

Dim a, b, c As Integer
    a = 100
    b = 50
    c = 20

    Dim r = Function()
                For i = 1 To a
                    For j = 1 To b
                        For k = 1 To c
                            If i * j * k = 150 Then Return 1
                        Next
                    Next
                Next
                Return 2
            End Function

    Console.WriteLine(r)

Keyword: closure

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