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I'm supposed to input real numbers until a input of 0 is encountered, then program should terminate. I got this code working for integer data type:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;
    int a[60];

    for(i=0;i<60;i++)
        a[i]=-1;

    for(i=0;;i++)
    {
        scanf("%d",&a[i]);
        if(a[i]==0)
            break;
    }

    return 0;
}

But when I try the same code on the double data type, program termination does not occur on input of 0. Here's the code:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;
    double a[60];

    for(i=0;i<60;i++)
        a[i]=-1.0;

    for(i=0;;i++)
    {
        scanf("%f",&a[i]);
        if(a[i]==0.0)
            break;
    }

    return 0;
}

Would anyone bother to explain why is this so? I can't think of any reason. Thank You in advance.

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Have you tried a printf("%f",a[i]) after the scanf, to see what your program makes of your input? –  Rhymoid Dec 28 '12 at 15:03
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For one thing, your parse string is incorrect: for double it should be "%lf", not "%f", which is for floats.

Secondly, in general comparing floating-point types for equality is error-prone because they are by nature approximative, although in this case, 0 is a value that can be represented exactly.

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So your second point is moot: 0 is a carefully chosen sentinel value. The first point seems to suggest the problem is with reading from partially uninitialized memory. –  Rhymoid Dec 28 '12 at 15:05
    
Thank You. The thing is, I thought about my conversion specifier being wrong, but failed to actually realize where the problem is. Thanks once again. –  Toma Zdravkovic Dec 28 '12 at 15:22
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As mentioned by Dr_Asik, the problem is with parsing the input. While you should use "%lf", which is the appropriate format string for doubles, you are using "%f", which is for floats.

Let's see what happens if float and double are binary-32 and binary-64 floats as defined in IEEE-754 (this is the case on x86 platforms):

  • First, you initialize every 64-bit element of a with -1.0. This is 0xBFF0000000000000, and since x86 is a little-endian system, this is stored as 00 00 00 00 00 00 F0 BF.
  • Then, you parse an element with scanf("%f", &a[i]). The only hint scanf gets about the memory you're pointing at is that it's a float, so it will only write a float. This means that only the first 32 bits of the element will be changed. If the user writes 0, the value of the cell will remain 00 00 00 00 00 00 F0 BF: the lower 32 bits are set to represent 0 (actually, positive zero).
  • Finally, because a is an array of doubles, you compare a[i] and 0.0 as doubles. In case the input was 0, a[i] would still be -1.0.

Actually, in your second program, the value of a[i] will always be between -1.0 and -1.000001, because you never overwrite the upper 32 bits. Had you chosen to initialize the array with 0.0, you might not have caught this bug for a long time.


There are two additional problems with your code:

  • Also mentioned by Dr_Asik: apart from values that are represented (and parsed) exactly, such as 0, you should avoid using exact comparisons. This is especially true for floating point results of computations.
  • Don't assume your user is going to input less than 61 values. Add a condition to the for-loop to avoid overwriting the memory.
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