Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to initialize an array of size 5 pointers that holds pointers to functions that have no parameters and which returns an int (could be any function that facilitate these requirements).

This is what i tried thus far but i get a syntax error:

int (*func)() fparr[5] = int (*func)();

What is wrong with this syntax?

share|improve this question
    
1  
Why are you doing = int (*func)();? –  Masked Man Dec 28 '12 at 14:59

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the function you want to supply as the default contents of the array is called func, then

  1. you better use a typedef,
  2. you have to use an array initializer

Consider:

typedef int (*IntFunc)(void);
IntFunc fparr[5] = { func, func, func, func, func };

Or the less readable way, if you prefer to avoid typedef:

int (*fparr[5])(void) = { func, func, func, func, func };
share|improve this answer
    
The typedef-less way is wrong. It should be int (*fparr[5])(void) = .... It's not only less readable, but also less writable. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '12 at 15:08
    
@DanielFischer Right. How possibly could I get that wrong? –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 15:10
    
It's freaking easy to get that wrong, look at everybody else on this page ;) –  Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '12 at 15:14
    
@DanielFischer Sure... :) (Why do you think I suggested that typedef...) –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 15:15
    
Because, despite being 18 (according to your profile, unless that changed in the last days), you are basically sane. –  Daniel Fischer Dec 28 '12 at 15:16

Because you are not actually initialising an array of function pointers ... try:

int (*fparr[5])(void) = { func1, func2, func3, func4, func5 };
share|improve this answer

Step 1:

define the signature of the functions as a type FN:

typedef int (*FN)();

Step2:

define the 5 functions with the FN signature:

int f1(void) { ; }
int f2(void) { ; }
...

Step 3:

define and initialize an array of 5 functions of type FN:

FN fparr[5] = {f1,f2,f3,f4,f5}

otherwise:

If you do not want to define a separate signature, you can do it -- as said before -- so:

 int ((*)fpar []) () = {f1,f2, ...}

If you know the number of functions from the array at the moment of declarations, you do not need to write 5, the compiler allocated this memory for you, if you initialize the array at the same line as the declaration.

share|improve this answer
    
@Christoph : In standard C, f() and f(void) are different. () tells the compiler to disable the checking of parameters. for example, if you want to add 1 to a variable i before calling a function f, you can do it so: int f(){;}main(){int i=3;f(i++);printf("%d",i);}. –  alinsoar Dec 28 '12 at 18:05
    
if you use typedef int (*FN)(); instead of typedef int (*FN)(void); the compiler will happily accept static int can_has_arg(int x) { return x; } FN fparr[] = { can_has_arg } whereas Tom stated that he wants an array of pointers to functions taking no arguments –  Christoph Dec 28 '12 at 18:23

Well, I'm late...

#include <stdio.h>

int fun0()
{
    return 0;
}

int fun1()
{
    return 1;
}

int fun2()
{
    return 2;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    int (*f[]) (void) = {fun0, fun1, fun2};
    printf("%d\n", f[0]());
    printf("%d\n", f[1]());
    printf("%d\n", f[2]());
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
EMPTY PARENTHESES ARE NOT EQUIVALENT TO VOID IN C (gcc -Wstrict-prototypes warns: function declaration isn't a prototype –  Jens Dec 28 '12 at 15:36
    
@Jens Thank you for comment. I will fix it. –  bwdeng Dec 28 '12 at 15:42
    
better late than never ! –  alinsoar Dec 28 '12 at 17:47

Here is a working example showing the correct syntax:

#include <stdio.h>

int test1(void) {
    printf("test1\n");
    return 1;
}

int test2(void) {
    printf("test2\n");
    return 2;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    int (*fparr[2])(void) = { test1, test2 };

    fparr[0]();
    fparr[1]();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
test1 and test2: control reaches end of non-void function. And empty parameter lists should be spelled (void) not () because the latter is old-style (K&R C) and C99-deprecated. –  Jens Dec 28 '12 at 15:32
    
Thanks. I've updated the example. –  Sean Bright Dec 28 '12 at 15:54

Example code:

static int foo(void) { return 42; }

int (*bar[5])(void) = { foo, foo, foo, foo, foo };

Note that the types int (*)() and int (*)(void) are distinct types - the former denotes a function with a fixed but unspecified number of arguments, whereas the latter denotes a function with no arguments.

Also note that the C declarator syntax follows the same rules as expressions (in particular operator precedence) and is thus read inside-out:

bar denotes and array (bar[5]) of pointers (*bar[5]) to functions (int (*bar[5])(void)). The parens (*bar[5]) are necessary because postfix function calls bind more tightly than prefix pointer indirection.

share|improve this answer

An array of function pointers can be initialized in another way with a default value.


Example Code

   
#include <stdio.h>

void add(int index, int a, int b){
    printf("%d. %d + %d = %d\n", index, a, b, a + b);
}
void sub(int index, int a, int b){
    printf("%d. %d - %d = %d\n", index, a, b, a - b);
}
int main(){
    void (*func[10])(int, int, int) = {[0 ... 9] = add};
    func[4] = sub;
    int i;
    for(i = 0; i < 10; i++)func[i](i, i + 10, i + 2);
}
   
If you run the above program, you will have the below output. All elements are initialized with function add, but 4th element in array is assigned to function sub


Output

0. 10 + 2 = 12
1. 11 + 3 = 14
2. 12 + 4 = 16
3. 13 + 5 = 18
4. 14 - 6 = 8
5. 15 + 7 = 22
6. 16 + 8 = 24
7. 17 + 9 = 26
8. 18 + 10 = 28
9. 19 + 11 = 30

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.