Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

I need a two-way communication between a kernel-mode WFP driver and a user-mode application. The driver initiates the communication by passing a URL to the application which then does a categorization of that URL (Entertainment, News, Adult, etc.) and passes that category back to the driver. The driver needs to know the category in the filter function because it may block certain web pages based on that information. I had a thread in the application that was making an I/O request that the driver would complete with the URL and a GUID, and then the application would write the category into the registry under that GUID where the driver would pick it up. Unfortunately, as the driver verifier pointed out, this is unstable because the Zw registry functions have to run at PASSIVE_LEVEL. I was thinking about trying the same thing with mapped memory buffers, but I’m not sure what the interrupt requirements are for that. Also, I thought about lowering the interrupt level before the registry function calls, but I don't know what the side effects of that are.

share|improve this question
You're already using conventional I/O from the driver to the application to pass the URLs; why not use conventional I/O to return the result as well? – Harry Johnston Dec 29 '12 at 0:45
Because the request initiates from the driver, I couldn't figure out how to make it work. The app makes an I/O request, the driver completes it with the URL in the output buffer, then how does the app get information back to the driver since the I/O request is complete? Also, the operation is time-sensitive because I'm making a decision about whether to block a web page. – jeffm Dec 29 '12 at 22:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You just need to have two different kinds of I/O request.

If you're using DeviceIoControl to retrieve the URLs (I think this would be the most suitable method) this is as simple as adding a second I/O control code.

If you're using ReadFile or equivalent, things would normally get a bit messier, but as it happens in this specific case you only have two kinds of operations, one of which is a read (driver->application) and the other of which is a write (application->driver). So you could just use WriteFile to send the reply, including of course the GUID so that the driver can match up your reply to the right query.

Another approach (more similar to your original one) would be to use a shared memory buffer. See this answer for more details. The problem with that idea is that you would either need to use a spinlock (at the cost of system performance and power consumption, and of course not being able to work on a single-core system) or to poll (which is both inefficient and not really suitable for time-sensitive operations).

share|improve this answer

There is nothing unstable about PASSIVE_LEVEL. Access to registry must be at PASSIVE_LEVEL so it's not possible directly if driver is running at higher IRQL. You can do it by offloading to work item, though. Lowering the IRQL is usually not recommended as it contradicts the OS intentions.

Your protocol indeed sounds somewhat cumbersome and doing a direct app-driver communication is probably preferable. You can find useful information about this here:

share|improve this answer
Sorry, I could have phrased that better. It's "unstable" in the sense that it doesn't crash every time, but the WFP filter functions run at DISPATCH_LEVEL so the registry functions are inappropriate. – jeffm Dec 29 '12 at 22:05

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.