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Code before the first ‘case’ in a switch-statement

I have the following set of code in C:

void isFindValue(int value1, int value2)
{
    switch (value1)
    {
    case 1:
      printf("value1 is found!\n");
      break;

    case 2:
      printf("value1 is found!\n");
      break;

    case 3:
      switch(value2)
      {
    printf("aaaaaaaaaaaaa\n");
     case 6:
         printf("bbbbbbbbbbbb\n");
         printf("value2 is found!\n");
         break;
      }
     default:
     break;    
}

if I call the function as is isFindValue(3,6); the printf of bbbbbbbbbbbb show up, but aaaaaaaaaaaaa does not, why this will happen? should we not do something before the case?

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6  
stackoverflow.com/a/2102434/1233508 –  DCoder Dec 28 '12 at 15:17
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marked as duplicate by Daniel Fischer, Brian Roach, Blue Moon, simonc, Blastfurnace Dec 28 '12 at 15:22

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Because switch () works using labels. It jumps to the label of which the condition is satisfied. So when reaching

switch(value2) {
    printf("aaaaaaaaaaaaa\n");
    case 6:

the control flow immediately jumps to the label case 6: so that it skips the call to printf().

The solution would be placing it correctly, outside of the inner switch:

case 3:
    printf("aaaaa\n");
    switch (value2) {

etc.

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Yes, another reason why labels should be avoided (or at least consumed moderately). –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 15:21
    
Why does this provide an argument against using labels (and therefor switch-case statements), H2CO3? –  Joost Dec 28 '12 at 15:54
    
@Joost Because labels are easy to abuse (just like in this case). Also, generally speaking, labels don't represent a good style when you can have nice structured control-flow statements such as if or various loops. Consider the point of the "while vs. goto begin" debate. –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 15:58
    
The while v goto debate has nothing to do with the switch-case. Are you're saying the switch statement should be pulled because there's an if construction available? –  Joost Dec 28 '12 at 16:00
    
@Joost Well, that's quite radical, but if you wish so, yes. –  user529758 Dec 28 '12 at 16:01
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"aaaaaaaaaaaaa" is not showing up because it is misplaced (it's not contained in a label so it is unreachable). You need to move it up to before the second switch statement:

case 3:
    printf("aaaaaaaaaaaaa\n");
    switch(value2)
    {
        // body
    }
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The call to the printf function in the statement :

printf("aaaaaaaaaaaaa\n");

cannot be reached because it is before the first case statement of the second switch.

see Code before the first 'case' in a switch-statement

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"aaaaaaaaaaaaa\n" is not being printed within any case. Your code is not properly structured.

Try moving the statement out of the switch block like this:

printf("aaaaaaaaaaaaa\n");
switch(value2)
{
    case 6:
        printf("bbbbbbbbbbbb\n");
        printf("value2 is found!\n");
        break;
}
break;
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switch always look for case and that's why aaaaaaaaaaaa was skipped. It will execute the statement of related case block.

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