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Does there exist a way to force Oracle (on inserts/updates/deletes) to utilize the row_num analytic function to assign row numbers, that can later be retrieved by simply invoking where rownumber = X?

Example code to illustrate what I mean:

select foo,bar,baz  
    row_number() over (partition by bang order by some_date desc) rn  
from my_table

The above query would assign row numbers based on the partition clause.

Now when I query and I want where rownumber = X I could do this:

select foo,bar,baz  
from my_table  
where rownumber=1

The reason for this is to avoid the query overhead and push it back into DDL statements which occur far less frequently in the system. So my question again, is something like this possible?

COMMENT

Each new insert/update/delete would potentially update each and every row of your table... that's potentially a lot of logging (and locking). If your data's essentially static, then regenerate the rownumber each time you load or update.

If we remove the constraint of updates/deletes and I do not believe that this reasoning still stands especially in the case when a temporal object is what drives this.

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Each new insert/update/delete would potentially update each and every row of your table... that's potentially a lot of logging (and locking). If your data's essentially static, then regenerate the rownumber each time you load or update. –  Mat Dec 28 '12 at 15:31
    
@Mat So lets remove the constraint of updates and deletes. If I only do inserts, where the driving force is in fact a timestamp / date then what? –  Woot4Moo Dec 28 '12 at 15:32
    
Well, then you calculate the rownumber before doing the actual insert (with a lot of care for concurrency). –  Mat Dec 28 '12 at 15:34
    
@Mat ok, how can I do this? –  Woot4Moo Dec 28 '12 at 15:35
    
The best way to do it is going to depend on how you do your inserts (how much you can control them especially), and what that date actually represents. Even with only inserts, you still need, in the general case, to consider that some rows could need to be re-ordered. –  Mat Dec 28 '12 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

One problem with a method for this is that you could only have a single process modifying the table, or a subset of it as defined by the partition-by clause, at one time. This is because multiple sessions modifying the table cannot see the changes made by others until they are commited.

However, if you can cope with this restriction through locking then there's no reason why this cannot be coded. Insert-only with values always incrementing would be relatively simple, but other situations would be rather more complex of course and none would be automatic that i could think of. I'd hesitate to offer detailed advice or coding samples though.

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Sure. As it stands I offset the expense of the row_num function into a materialized view. I was toying with the idea of forcing this into process that feeds Oracle so that there would be less work done by the database. –  Woot4Moo Dec 28 '12 at 15:41
 SELECT ename, deptno, rownum, rno
  FROM (SELECT ename, deptno, row_number() OVER (Order By deptno) rno
           FROM scott.emp
        ORDER BY deptno)
 /
ENAME          DEPTNO     ROWNUM        RNO
---------- ---------- ---------- ----------
CLARK              10          1          1
KING               10          2          2
MILLER             10          3          3
JONES              20          4          4
FORD               20          5          5
ADAMS              20          6          6
....

You can insert all or some values - remove unwanted from outer Select part:

INSERT INTO emp_test2
(
SELECT ename, deptno, rownum row_num, rno
  FROM (SELECT ename, deptno, row_number() OVER (Order By deptno) rno
       FROM scott.emp
    ORDER BY deptno)
);
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now how can I force Oracle to maintain this on inserts? So I don't need to execute the row_number function? –  Woot4Moo Dec 28 '12 at 19:16
    
Not sure what are you asking... –  Art Dec 28 '12 at 19:57
    
I am asking during insertion, before the data is in oracle, is it possible to force the row_number function to be run against the insert function to generate the ordering maintained by that function –  Woot4Moo Dec 28 '12 at 20:05
    
Look at my example again - insert part. I just created a table and inserted the rows exactly as they selected... This is all I can help you with as I still do not know what do you mean by insert function etc... If you are trying to insert rows in some order then my example should give you a clue. Thanks, Art. –  Art Dec 28 '12 at 20:10

Are you intending to create a PK_ID? If so, use a SEQUENCE instead. It will do that job for you.

CREATE SEQUENCE - Oracle Documentation

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