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I have this YAML entries;

table:
  - name: table_a
select:
  - id: source.id
  - code: source.code
  - name: source.name
  - is_active: TRUE

I need to read this into a HASH array and construct a SELECT SQL statement like this;

SELECT 
  source.id as id,
  source.code as code,
  source.name as name,
  TRUE as is_active
FROM table_a

I'm struggling to access HASH |key,value| pairs dynamically.

I used this code;

yml = YAML.load_file("file.yml")
yml.each_pair { |key, value| puts "#{key} = #{value}"}

But when I use yml['select'].each_pair I get "undefined method `each_pair'" error.

share|improve this question
2  
What specifically are you struggling with? Do you have sample code? What have you tried so far? –  Aaron Kurtzhals Dec 28 '12 at 16:09
    
I see no code that attempts to read the YAML data. And, what is a "HASH array"? –  the Tin Man Dec 28 '12 at 16:13
    
I edited my question to include sample code. I'm new in Ruby so pls bear with me if I'm not understanding the basics. –  csagan Dec 28 '12 at 16:19
    
Are you in control of the YAML? It's poorly designed and is creating an array of hash elements that make it difficult for you to access the individual select entries. –  the Tin Man Dec 28 '12 at 16:24
    
Yes, I create YAMLs. Each YAML file represents a table in my database to create dynamic table load scripts. –  csagan Dec 28 '12 at 16:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the YAML, here's how to parse it:

asdf = YAML.load('table:
  - name: table_a
select:
  - id: source.id
  - code: source.code
  - name: source.name
  - is_active: TRUE
  - created_at: Time.now()
  - updated_at: Time.now()')
=> {"table"=>[{"name"=>"table_a"}],
 "select"=>
  [{"id"=>"source.id"},
   {"code"=>"source.code"},
   {"name"=>"source.name"},
   {"is_active"=>true},
   {"created_at"=>"Time.now()"},
   {"updated_at"=>"Time.now()"}]}

Your YAML isn't creating an easily parsed data structure, which is making you jump through hoops to access elements:

asdf['table'][0]['name']
=> "table_a"

asdf['select'][4]['created_at']
=> "Time.now()" 

Instead, it should look like:

table:
  name: table_a
select:
  id: source.id
  code: source.code
  name: source.name
  is_active: TRUE
  created_at: Time.now()
  updated_at: Time.now()

Which, after parsing, will create a hash of hashes looking like:

{
  "table"=>{
    "name" => "table_a"
  },
  "select" =>
  {
    "id"         => "source.id",
    "code"       => "source.code",
    "name"       => "source.name",
    "is_active"  => true,
    "created_at" => "Time.now()",
    "updated_at" => "Time.now()"
  }
}

That allows you to easily, and very intuitively, access elements:

asdf['table']
=> {"name"=>"table_a"}
asdf['select']['created_at']
=> "Time.now()"

YAML won't turn the string "Time.now()" into a Ruby Time.now method call, so encoding that string into the YAML data won't help.

Instead, after parsing it, use:

time_now = Time.now
select = asdf['select']
select['created_at'] = time_now
select['updated_at'] = time_now

You can update your "Time.now()" strings by pre-manipulating your incoming YAML, then parsing it:

yaml_string = '
table:
  name: table_a
select:
  id: source.id
  code: source.code
  name: source.name
  is_active: TRUE
  created_at: Time.now()
  updated_at: Time.now()
'
yaml_string.gsub!('Time.now()', Time.now.to_s)

Which results in:

table:
  name: table_a
select:
  id: source.id
  code: source.code
  name: source.name
  is_active: TRUE
  created_at: 2012-12-28 10:09:21 -0700
  updated_at: 2012-12-28 10:09:21 -0700

Parsing it now returns:

=> {"table"=>{"name"=>"table_a"},
 "select"=>
  {"id"=>"source.id",
   "code"=>"source.code",
   "name"=>"source.name",
   "is_active"=>true,
   "created_at"=>2012-12-28 10:09:21 -0700,
   "updated_at"=>2012-12-28 10:09:21 -0700}}

And YAML can do something with that time value, because it recognizes it:

[14] pry(main)> asdf['select']['created_at']
=> 2012-12-28 10:09:21 -0700
[15] pry(main)> asdf['select']['created_at'].class
=> Time

In addition, rather than write your own SQL, I strongly recommend using an ORM, like Sequel or DataMapper. I favor Sequel, but, in either case, the advantage is you don't have to write the queries, the ORM does. You tell it what database and tables to access and it figures out the schema and relationships. If you're using Rails, ActiveRecord is a good ORM, which is coupled with Rails. It can be used separately, but I'd recommend the other two first if you are not using Rails.

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I can't use select['created_at'] since "key"s of the hash has dynamic values which changes in the run-time –  csagan Dec 28 '12 at 16:22
    
If your keys are changing at runtime then you are going to have to write some very dynamic Ruby. When working with a database, the keys are the field names, and never change, and the values associated with the keys are the field contents. If your keys change your statement really sounds like confusion on your part about how code talks to databases, and/or some badly written code. –  the Tin Man Dec 28 '12 at 16:49

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