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I have a table in csv format, the data is the following:

            1           3            1          2
1415_at 1   8.512147859 8.196725061 8.174426394 8.62388149
1411_at 2   9.119200527 9.190318548 9.149239039 9.211401637
1412_at 3   10.03383593 9.575728316 10.06998673 9.735217522
1413_at 4   5.925999419 5.692092375 5.689299161 7.807354922

When I read it with:

m <- read.csv("table.csv")

and print the values of m, I notice that they change to:

        X   X.1        X1       X3      X1.1       X4
1 1415_at   1       8.512148 8.196725  8.174426 8.623881

I made some manipulation to keep only those columns that are labelled 1 or 2, so I do that with:

smallerdat <- m[ grep("^X$|^X.1$|^X1$|^X2$|1\\.|2\\." , names(m) ) ]

write.csv(smallerdat,"table2.csv")

it writes me the file with those annoying headers and that first column added, which I do not need it:

      X   X.1        X1             X1.1       X2
1 1415_at   1       8.512148   8.174426 8.623881

so when I open that data in Excel the headers are still X, X.1 and son on. What I need is that the headers remain the same as:

                     1      1           2
1415_at 1       8.196725061 8.174426394 8.62388149

any help?

Please notice also that first column that is added automatically, I do not need it, so how I can get rid that of that column?

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1  
Did you try passing col.names=F? –  cciotti Dec 28 '12 at 16:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two issues here.

  1. For reading your CSV file, use:

    m <- read.csv("table.csv", check.names = FALSE)
    

    Notice that by doing this, though, you can't use the column names as easily. You have to quote them with backticks instead, and will most likely still run into problems because of duplicated column names:

    m$1
    # Error: unexpected numeric constant in "mydf$1"
    mydf$`1`
    # [1]  8.512148  9.119201 10.033836  5.925999
    
  2. For writing your "m" object to a CSV file, use:

    write.csv(m, "table2.csv", row.names = FALSE)
    

After reading your file in using the method in step 1, you can subset as follows. If you wanted the first column and any columns named "3" or "4", you can use:

m[names(m) %in% c("", "3", "4")]
#                    3        4
# 1 1415_at 1 8.196725 8.623881
# 2 1411_at 2 9.190319 9.211402
# 3 1412_at 3 9.575728 9.735218
# 4 1413_at 4 5.692092 7.807355

Update: Fixing the names before using write.csv

If you don't want to start from step 1 for whatever reason, you can still fix your problem. While you've succeeded in taking a subset with your grep statement, that doesn't change the column names (not sure why you would expect that it should). You have to do this by using gsub or one of the other regex solutions.

Here are the names of the columns with the way you have read in your CSV:

names(m)
# [1] "X"    "X.1"  "X1"   "X3"   "X1.1" "X2"  

You want to:

  • Remove all "X"s
  • Remove all ".some-number"

So, here's a workaround:

# Change the names in your original dataset
names(m) <- gsub("^X|\\.[0-9]$", "", names(m))
# Create a temporary object to match desired names
getme <- names(m) %in% c("", "1", "2")
# Subset your data
smallerdat <- m[getme]
# Reassign names to your subset
names(smallerdat) <- names(m)[getme]
share|improve this answer
    
the problem @Ananda Mahto is that I cannot used fixed values like you proposed –  Layla Dec 28 '12 at 16:43
    
@Manolo, can you expand on your comment? I'm not sure what you mean by "fixed values". –  Ananda Mahto Dec 28 '12 at 16:46
    
please @Ananda Mahto, give a quick look to my edited question, thanks for your help –  Layla Dec 28 '12 at 16:50
1  
@Manolo, please try my suggestion from Step 1, the read.csv modification. That will allow you to do smallerdat <- m[names(m) %in% c("", "1", "2")]; write.csv(smallerdat, file = "table2.csv", row.names = FALSE). I don't see where you're running into a problem with my suggestion. –  Ananda Mahto Dec 28 '12 at 16:54
    
@Manolo, of course it would leave an empty data.frame because I'm guessing you haven't started from the first step as I suggested. –  Ananda Mahto Dec 28 '12 at 17:16

I am not sure I understand what you are attempting to do, but here is some code that reads a csv file with missing headers for the first two columns, selects only columns with a header of 1 or 2 and then writes that new data file retaining the column names of 1 or 2.

# first read in only the headers and deal with the missing 
# headers for columns 1 and 2

b <- readLines('c:/users/Mark W Miller/simple R programs/missing_headers.csv', 
     n = 1)
b <- unlist(strsplit(b, ","))
b[1] <- 'name1'
b[2] <- 'name2'
b <- gsub(" ","", b, fixed=TRUE)
b

# read in the rest of the data file

my.data <- (
 read.table(file = "c:/users/mark w miller/simple R programs/missing_headers.csv", 
 na.string=NA, header = F, skip=1, sep=','))

colnames(my.data) <- b

# select the columns with names of 1 or 2

my.data <- my.data[names(my.data) %in% c("1", "2")]

# retain the original column names of 1 or 2

names(my.data) <- floor(as.numeric(names(my.data)))

# write the new data file with original column names

write.csv(
  my.data, "c:/users/mark w miller/simple R programs/missing_headers_out.csv",
            row.names=FALSE, quote=FALSE)

Here is the input data file. Note the commas with missing names for columns 1 and 2:

       ,  ,             1,           3,           1,          2
1415_at, 1,   8.512147859, 8.196725061, 8.174426394, 8.62388149
1411_at, 2,   9.119200527, 9.190318548, 9.149239039, 9.211401637
1412_at, 3,   10.03383593, 9.575728316, 10.06998673, 9.735217522
1413_at, 4,   5.925999419, 5.692092375, 5.689299161, 7.807354922

Here is the output data file:

1,1,2
8.512147859,8.174426394,8.62388149
9.119200527,9.149239039,9.211401637
10.03383593,10.06998673,9.735217522
5.925999419,5.689299161,7.807354922
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