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When I open one file it contains something like this:

It's that

What is this and how do I convert it to ASCII ?

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5 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is HTML encoding, use WebUtility.HtmlDecode (in System.Net namespace):

string encoded = "It's that";
string decoded = System.Net.WebUtility.HtmlDecode(s);
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Thank you... it worked :) –  a1204773 Dec 28 '12 at 16:18
    
but html tag <br> not decoded or at least it not leaves new line –  a1204773 Dec 28 '12 at 16:20
    
What do you mean not decoded? What's yours encoded string? –  walkhard Dec 28 '12 at 16:23
    
The original text had new lines but my text after decoding doesn't have new lines –  a1204773 Dec 28 '12 at 16:25
    
Then encoding seems to be the problem, newlines (\r\n or \n) are different stuff than <br /> tag. –  walkhard Dec 28 '12 at 16:26
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HttpUtility.HtmlDecode() will do the trick.

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Those are HTML entities. They represent ascii characters. You can decode them using HttpUtility.HTMLDecode().

If you're just trying to read this one line, you could also rename the file to a .html file and open it in your browser of choice. There are even tools that do this online.

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The number between the &# ; is likely an ASCII code.
Convert the numbers manually or use the HTMLDecode to save yourself some time...

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If you're using .Net Framework 4.0 or higher then the System.Net.WebUtility.HtmlDecode(s) will work.

I needed this solution for an SSRS report where only 3.5 was supported. Since the namespace above wasn't available I went the alternate route of

System.Web.HttpUtility.HtmlDecode(rawString)
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