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Oh great Stackoverflow, I beseech thee... I need to do the following:

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX UserName ON Emp(UserName) -- Sheesh!

UPDATE Emp SET
UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName

WHERE NOT exists an employee with that UserName already.

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1  
do you really want to update the entire set of usernames? This is a dangerous idea. –  HLGEM Sep 10 '09 at 19:45
    
This wil still allow duplicates... I'd guess you are trying to avoid duplicates, not just reset UserNames where no existing one is the same as the proposed new value ? –  Charles Bretana Sep 10 '09 at 19:56
    
No, what I'd like to do is assign a username to an employee. I've reduced the question down to a single statement so that someone could answer because I can't figure out the syntax. –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:00
    
Yes, what I'd like to do is assign a new employee a username - 1 that doesn't already exist. –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This will still allow duplicates... but if you want what you said, Try this (exactly what you said):

UPDATE Emp SET
   UserName = Left(FirstName,1) + LastName
Where Not Exists (Select * From Emp 
                  Where UserName = Left(FirstName,1) + LastName)

I'd guess, however, that you are trying to avoid duplicates, not just reset UserNames where no existing one is the same as the proposed new value. If so, you should add a unique index on the userName column, but first, run this:

UPDATE Emp SET
   UserName = Left(FirstName,1) + LastName
Where  Not Exists 
             (Select * From Emp 
              Where UserName = Left(FirstName,1) + LastName)
    And Not Exists 
             (Select * From Emp 
              Group By Left(FirstName,1) + LastName
              Having Count(*) > 1)

This will reset all the UserNames that CAN be reset without creating duplicates. (It will not eliminate existing Dupes). If there are no dupes after this, you can apply the index.

share|improve this answer
    
I think that your subquery isn't comparing against the value in the outer query. –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 19:50
    
I guess what I'm looking for is the syntax for how an inner select can reference the EmpID in the outer update statement. –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:09
    
Here is the syntax for referencing the outer select... update e set UserName = ... from Emp e where not exists(select * from Emp where UserName = Left(e.FirstName, 1) + e.LastName)... –  Crappy Coding Guy Sep 10 '09 at 21:45

I would put an unique index on username and use:

UPDATE IGNORE Emp SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName

If your database supports that ;)

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1  
+1 on unique index - you can put all kinds of validation in your app but it only takes one mistake from a DBA or someone with write access to corrupt your data. –  Mayo Sep 10 '09 at 19:46
    
Does SQL Server support an IGNORE clause? What did you mean by the smiley? Does that mean something along the lines of "too bad you can't do this!"? –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:02
    
Mysql supports it. I don't know if any other db does. –  Pomyk Sep 10 '09 at 21:58

Yeah, incase you do not read further down username really should be Unique also i would make sure there is something else in the where clause because that is going to be an intense query.

You may consider writing a function to do this for you to add some other uniqueness or id to the end if it exists (Count(*) where userName like Username).

UPDATE Emp SET
UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
WHERE
UserName not in (Select UserName From Emp Where UserName = Left(FirstName,1) + LastName)
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming SQL database is TSQL –  Highstead Sep 10 '09 at 19:42
1  
and assuming you don't cause a duplicate when you're updating, ie if you have John Smith and James Smith, they both become JSmith during the update. –  Chris Chilvers Sep 10 '09 at 19:48
    
I think that your subquery isn't examining the value in the outer part of the statement. –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 19:52
    
Your references to FirstName and LastName in your subquery are looking at Emp in the subquery, not Emp in the outer query (as psenn said). You need to alias the outer query and reference the alias in the subquery. –  Crappy Coding Guy Sep 10 '09 at 21:43

In the first place, your username field should have a unique index. If you don;t then your data is at risk form someone updating without using your little update statement. Current code suggestions don't give you an example of how to handle the setting of the user name if the existing one is used, what do you want to do? This should be part of your process. User needs a username.

just to show here is one way to handle incrementing the username until you get one that doesn't exist. This example is an insert not an update, but I think you can use it as a starting place. BY using this method (and this is for one record at a time inserts), no one ever gets into the system with a duplicate username and errors are not thrown if an exact match exists, it justs moves on to find the next match.

CREATE PROC [dbo].[ins_MyUserTable]
(
@userID int,
@Login varchar(255)
)

As

DECLARE 

@ValidateUserName varchar(50),
@NewUserName varchar(50),
@CheckUserName varchar(50),
@Holding int

-- Get User Name (first letter of first name + last name)
SELECT @NewUserName = @Login
SET @Holding = 0

-- Examine User Name (must be unique)
SELECT @ValidateUserName = 1

WHILE @ValidateUserName = 1
  BEGIN
	-- Check for Login
	SELECT @CheckUserName = (SELECT TOP 1 login FROM MyUserTable WHERE login = @NewUserName)

	IF @CheckUserName = @NewUserName
	  BEGIN
                	SELECT @Holding = @Holding + 1
		SELECT @NewUserName = @Login + Convert(varchar(2), @Holding)
	  END
	ELSE
	  BEGIN
		SELECT @ValidateUserName = 0
	  END
  END
	-- Insert  into MyUserTable 
	INSERT INTO MyUserTable
	  ([user_id], login)
	VALUES
	  (@userID, @NewUserName)
share|improve this answer
    
What I would like to do is assign a username to an employee. I would like it to be the first letter of the first name, followed by the last name. I would like to not throw an error if an employee already has that username. But I don't want to complicate the example to the point that people don't understand it. So I reduced the example down to 1 statement. That's what I've done. –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 19:58

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