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I've got usb cable plugged to my computer, which D+ and D- pins are connected to multimeter. I want to send some raw bytes to get some voltage.. is it possible at all?

I'm 99% sure that usb port I've plugged cable in is something like /dev/bus/usb/002

I know that there was possibility to do the same with LPT or RS232 ports.

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RS232 and LPT are not bus ! USB devices need to be addressed in order to become reachable. –  F. Hauri Dec 28 '12 at 17:06
    
Maybe unloading and reloading usb driver that drive your usb host... or trying to make a reset on usb hub host... –  F. Hauri Dec 28 '12 at 17:11
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

RS232 and LPT are not bus ! USB devices need to be addressed in order to become reachable.

Maybe unloading and reloading usb driver that drive your usb host... or trying to make a reset on usb hub host...

For doing this kind of operation on usb port, you have to break usb kernel driver and whipe all addressing operation to address directly the chipset...

At all, due to USB concept, I'm not sure you may successfully hold some power state on outlet.

For playing with that kind of physical IO, two solution:

Install a low-cost RS-232 <-> USB adapter

or better

Buy an Arduino micro-controller for prototyping and development.

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I'm nearly 100% sure that you can't send anything down your USB lead unless you actually have a device at the other end. If you still want to play with this, get a cheap memory stick, break the casing off it [not too roughly], and measure whilst doing a large file-transfer to the memory stick, or some such.

But I'm not sure your multimeter will show much, as they tend to be a bit slow, compared to USB rates.

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I'm using multimeter to check if there is or there isn't voltage, not measuring it's value. –  Adrian Adamczyk Dec 28 '12 at 17:04
    
I know that there was possibility to do the same with LPT or RS232 ports. –  Adrian Adamczyk Dec 28 '12 at 17:05
    
Yes, LPT and RS232 are possible to do this with, and in theory I think you can with USB too, but the driver architecture is completely different. I will dig around the driver to see what I can find. –  Mats Petersson Dec 28 '12 at 17:09
    
I get "Invalid argument" when writing to /dev/bus/usb/002/001 - that indicates that you need to do something more than just open the device itself to write to it. [I tried a couple of different devices] –  Mats Petersson Dec 28 '12 at 17:15
    
Also I've got the same, tried to write with Java and terminal. –  Adrian Adamczyk Dec 28 '12 at 17:17
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USB uses pull-up / pull-down resistors on the data lines to detect whether or not a port is connected (1.5k pull-up to 3.3v on the device side, 15k pull-down on the host side IIRC). The exact connection depends on the device speed.

So if you connect an appropriate resistor, the host should attempt to start signalling. Because of the data-rate, you might not be able to see that on a multimeter; an oscilloscope would be more appropriate.

If you want to by-pass the normal USB protocol and just blindly send data, I think you'll need to get your hands dirty and write code to bypass the usual device drivers and access the USB hardware directly. Even then I'm not sure what's possible - the USB hardware is a lot smarter than good ol' LPT and RS232 ports, which might get in the way of doing this sort of low level stuff.

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