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I have a function that returns an object that represents a record in my database plus additional columns. Instead of creating a separate class for this object I was wondering if there is another way, for example:

public object GetRecord(string key)
{
    var item = select new {column1, column2};

    return item;
}

public void main() 
{
    var item = GetRecord(1);

    //  I want to be able to reference column1 on item.  
    var x = item.column1;  
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Yes, there are other ways (quite a few actually), but I strongly suggest you not use any of them. The best option for handling this case is to create a new custom type that holds onto the data that you have. It will by far be the most maintainable option.

Anonymous types were designed specifically to be used within the scope of a single method. You're fighting the design of the functionality to do otherwise, and so it will be difficult to do, you'll most likely lose Intellisense, performance will most likely suffer, and the poor sap that needs to come back and maintain the code will have no idea what's going on or how to adjust the query.

The primary problem with most of the alternate solutions is that you lose compile time checking. If the query removes a parameter, adds a parameter, change a type, etc. the code that uses it has no way of knowing. When writing code to use a query you have no way of knowing what all of the pieces of data are, what their types are, what the names of the variables are, etc. You need to worry about typos in variable names that the compiler can't catch, and you'll consistently need to be looking at the internal workings of the method that generates the query. You lose the ability to treat it as a black box or abstraction, which is significant.

If you're worried about the time and effort it would take to create these custom types, there are a number of automated tools out there designed for generating such classes based on database tables or other sources.

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1  
+1, I see no reason to not create a custom type. –  Dave Zych Dec 28 '12 at 18:18

If it is .net 4.0 use dynamic keyword.

public dynamic GetRecord(string key)
{
   var item = select new {column1, column2};

   return item;
}
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I am using dynamic, but I assume the column name will not show up in the intellisense. but will work at runtime. –  magic-c0d3r Dec 28 '12 at 18:07
    
If you are on other scope that you has created your dynamic type, intellisense will not work. –  Felipe Oriani Dec 28 '12 at 18:08
    
For intellisense you need to use concrete type (which cannot be changed in select clause). Refer to answer by Felipe for that. –  Tilak Dec 28 '12 at 18:09
4  
I would strongly discourage the use of dynamic for these cases. It's worth the effort to create a concrete type both for initial development, and particularly for future maintenance. Using dynamic you won't get compile time errors if the data the query fetches doesn't line up with how those results are used, there's no Intellisense support, and the performance suffers. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 18:11
    
It depends. dynamic , Expando, anonymous type, object, Concrete type/Interfaces, each has some pros/cons and it is the context that matters. With dynamic comes flexibility but requires careful usage. I have found cases where usage of dynamic has improved code readability dramatically. –  Tilak Dec 28 '12 at 18:20

Also if it is .net 4.0 you can use a Tuple<object,object> then reference it by item.Item1. You can use typing of the objects instead of simply object.

public Tuple<Column1Type,Column2Type> GetRecord(string key)
{
   var item = select new Tuple<Column1Type,Column2Type>(column1, column2);

   return item;
}
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only complementing the other answers, you also could use Generics to do this. something like this:

public T GetRecord<T>(string key)
   where T : IAnyInterfaceWithProperties, new
{
   var item = select new T { PropertyOfInterface = value, Property2 = value2 };

   return item;
}
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1  
This is full of syntax errors. Put the new constraint after the interface constraint, remove the cast to T and the select. –  codesparkle Dec 28 '12 at 18:16
    
Thank you for the tips @codesparkle. I was thinking in this case, we really need to select keyword? –  Felipe Oriani Dec 28 '12 at 18:23

You might consider using a POCO library for this -- will do exactly what you want.

You can roll your own or use one which is already available:

http://code.google.com/p/dapper-dot-net/

Your code would then look something like this:

 var result = connection.Query("select col1, col2 from table1");

 var x = result[0].col1;  

Drapper also lets you have a strong type eg:

 var result = connection.Query<myType>("select col1, col2 from table1");

 ' Now result is a list of myType
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