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I can't remember whether passing an STL container makes a copy of the container, or just another alias. If I have a couple containers:

std::unordered_map<int,std::string> _hashStuff;
std::vector<char> _characterStuff;

And I want to pass those variables to a function, can I make the function as so:

void SomeClass::someFunction(std::vector<char> characterStuff);

Or would this make a copy of the unordered_map / vector? I'm thinking I might need to use shared_ptr.

void SomeClass::someFunction(std::shared_ptr<std::vector<char>> characterStuff);
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Shouldn't your single colons : be double colons ::? –  0x499602D2 Dec 28 '12 at 18:53
    
@David yes, they should be double colons :: –  Mr. Smith Dec 28 '12 at 18:54
    
To prevent copy pass by reference (preferably const reference). –  Loki Astari Dec 28 '12 at 22:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It depends. If you are passing an lvalue in input to your function (in practice, if you are passing something that has a name, to which the address-of operator & can be applied) then the copy constructor of your class will be invoked.

void foo(vector<char> v)
{
    ...
}

int bar()
{
    vector<char> myChars = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };
    foo(myChars); // myChars gets COPIED
}

If you are passing an rvalue (roughly, something that doesn't have a name and to which the address-of operator & cannot be applied) and the class has a move constructor, then the object will be moved (which is not, beware, the same as creating an "alias", but rather transferring the guts of the object into a new skeleton, making the previous skeleton useless).

In the invocation of foo() below, the result of make_vector() is an rvalue. Therefore, the object it returns is being moved when given in input to foo() (i.e. vector's move constructor will be invoked):

void foo(vector<char> v);
{
    ...
}

vector<char> make_vector() 
{ 
    ...
};

int bar()
{
    foo(make_vector()); // myChars gets MOVED
}

Some STL classes have a move constructor but do not have a copy constructor, because they inherently are meant to be non-copiable (for instance, unique_ptr). You won't get a copy of a unique_ptr when you pass it to a function.

Even for those classes that do have a copy constructor, you can still force move semantics by using the std::move function to change your argument from an lvalue into an rvalue, but again that doesn't create an alias, it just transfers the ownership of the object to the function you are invoking. This means that you won't be able to do anything else with the original object other than reassigning to it another value or having it destroyed.

For instance:

void foo(vector<char> v)
{
    ...
}

vector<char> make_vector() 
{ 
    ...
};

int bar()
{
    vector<char> myChars = { 'a', 'b', 'c' };
    foo(move(myChars)); // myChars gets MOVED
    cout << myChars.size(); // ERROR! object myChars has been moved
    myChars = make_vector(); // OK, you can assign another vector to myChars
}

If you find this whole subject of lvalue and rvalue references and move semantics obscure, that's very understandable. I personally found this tutorial quite helpful:

http://thbecker.net/articles/rvalue_references/section_01.html

You should be able to find some info also on http://www.isocpp.org or on YouTube (look for seminars by Scott Meyers).

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1  
Although all the answers here I consider correct enough to be marked as the answer, I found yours the most intriguing. –  Mr. Smith Dec 28 '12 at 20:47
    
Thank you! Anyway the best way to grasp this stuff after reading some good material is to try and play with it a little. I suggest you to write a small toy class with a move constructor and a copy constructor, pass it in to some functions by value and see which one is invoked (either by debugging or by putting some cout << msg inside). You will also notice that sometimes no constructor at all is invoked, like when returning from make_vector() above: that's an optimization compilers usually do –  Andy Prowl Dec 28 '12 at 21:17

Yes, it'll copy the vector because you're passing by value. Passing by value always makes a copy or move (which may be elided under certain conditions, but not in your case). If you want to refer to the same vector inside the function as outside, you can just pass it by reference instead. Change your function to:

void SomeClass::someFunction(std::vector<char>& characterStuff);

The type std::vector<char>& is a reference type, "reference to std::vector<char>". The name characterStuff will act as an alias for the object referred to by _characterStuff.

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Nitpick: I don't think passing by value always makes a copy. For instance, when passing a temporary by value, I am pretty sure that the compiler is allowed to elide the copy. –  Björn Pollex Dec 28 '12 at 18:55
    
@BjörnPollex Yes! I forgot to mention that. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 28 '12 at 18:58

C++ is based on values: When passing object by value you get independent copies. If you don't want to get a copy, you can use a reference or a const reference, instead:

void SomeClass::someFunction(std::vector<char>& changable) { ... }
void SomeClass::otherFunction(std::vector<char> const& immutable) { ... }

When the called function shouldn't be able to change the argument but you don't want to create a copy of the object, you'd want to pass by const&. Normally, I wouldn't use something like a std::shared_ptr<T> instead. There are uses of this type by certainly not to prevent copying when calling a function.

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