Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to be able to compare syntax trees for expressions. The base class Expr has a pure virtual compare method for concrete subclasses to override:

class Expr {
public:
  virtual bool compare(const Expr *other) const = 0;
};

As an example, say NumExpr and AddExpr are two concrete subclasses for representing a literal integer expression and a binary add expression respectively. The first thing each compare method does is use dynamic_cast to make sure the other expression is of the same type:

class NumExpr : public Expr {
  int num;
public:
  NumExpr(int n) : num(n) {}
  bool compare(const Expr *other) const {
    const NumExpr *e = dynamic_cast<const NumExpr*>(other);
    if (e == 0) return false;
    return num == e->num;
  }
};

class AddExpr : public Expr {
  Expr *left, *right;
public:
  AddExpr(Expr *l, Expr *r) : left(l), right(r) {}
  bool compare(const Expr *other) const {
    const AddExpr *e = dynamic_cast<const AddExpr*>(other);
    if (e == 0) return false;
    return left->compare(e->left) && right->compare(e->right);
  }
};

I always feel like I am doing something wrong when I use dynamic_cast -- is there a more appropriate approach to perform dynamic comparisons between objects without using dynamic_cast?

Using the visitor design pattern does not solve the need for RTTI (as far as I can tell). The abstract base class for an "expression visitor" might look something like this:

class NumExpr;
class AddExpr;

class ExprVisitor {
public:
  virtual void visit(NumExpr *e) {}; // "do nothing" default
  virtual void visit(AddExpr *e) {};
};

The base class for expressions includes a pure virtual accept method:

class Expr {
public:
  virtual void accept(ExprVisitor& v) = 0;
};

The concrete expression subclasses then use double dispatch to invoke the appropriate visit method:

class NumExpr : public Expr {
public:
  int num;
  NumExpr(int n) : num(n) {}
  virtual void accept(ExprVisitor& v) {
    v.visit(this);
  };
};

class AddExpr : public Expr {
public:
  Expr *left, *right;
  AddExpr(Expr *l, Expr *r) : left(l), right(r) {}
  virtual void accept(ExprVisitor& v) {
    v.visit(this);
  };
};

When we finally get to performing the expression comparisons using this mechanism, we still need to use RTTI (as far as I can tell); For example, here is a sample visitor class for comparing expressions:

class ExprCompareVisitor : public ExprVisitor {
  Expr *expr;
  bool result;
public:
  ExprCompareVisitor(Expr *e) : expr(e), result(false) {}
  bool getResult() const {return result;}

  virtual void visit(NumExpr *e) {
    NumExpr *other = dynamic_cast<NumExpr *>(expr);
    result = other != 0 && other->num == e->num;
  }

  virtual void visit(AddExpr *e) {
    AddExpr *other = dynamic_cast<AddExpr *>(expr);
    if (other == 0) return;

    ExprCompareVisitor vleft(other->left);
    e->left->accept(vleft);
    if (!vleft.getResult()) return;

    ExprCompareVisitor vright(other->right);
    e->right->accept(vright);
    result = vright.getResult();
  }
};

Note we are still using RTTI (dynamic_cast is this case).

If we truly wish to avoid RTTI we could "roll our own" be creating unique constants to identify every concrete expression flavor:

enum ExprFlavor {
  NUM_EXPR, ADD_EXPR
};

class Expr {
public:
  const ExprFlavor flavor;
  Expr(ExprFlavor f) : flavor(f) {}
  ...
};

Each concrete type would set this constant appropriately:

class NumExpr : public Expr {
public:
  int num;
  NumExpr(int n) : Expr(NUM_EXPR), num(n) {}
  ...
};

class AddExpr : public Expr {
public:
  Expr *left, *right;
  AddExpr(Expr *l, Expr *r) : Expr(ADD_EXPR), left(l), right(r) {}
  ...
};

Then we could use static_cast and the flavor field to avoid RTTI:

class ExprCompareVisitor : public ExprVisitor {
  Expr *expr;
  bool result;
public:
  ExprCompareVisitor(Expr *e) : expr(e), result(false) {}
  bool getResult() const {return result;}

  virtual void visit(NumExpr *e) {                                                                
    result = expr->flavor == NUM_EXPR && static_cast<NumExpr *>(expr)->num == e->num;
  }
  ...
};

This solution seems like I am just replicating what the RTTI is doing under the hood.

share|improve this question
1  
Look up double dispatch. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 28 '12 at 19:15
    
Or the visitor design pattern. –  brian beuning Dec 28 '12 at 20:05
    
is it right that the compare function returns true if the underlying expressions are the same and returns false in every other case... ? –  user1055604 Dec 29 '12 at 5:48
    
Yes. This is used to convert a syntax tree into a syntax DAG by recognizing common subtrees in the expression. e.g. (3 + x)*2 + (3 + x)/2 would only represent 3 + x once. –  wcochran Dec 31 '12 at 17:02
    
Thanks for the tips on using the visitor design pattern and double dispatch seeing that this makes a lot of sense for syntax trees for compilers (as described in these UW compiler course notes). OTOH, it does not solve the original problem, since the visit methods still need to perform some sort of RTTI to determine if two expressions are of the same type. I think this is a good example where RTTI is OK. –  wcochran Jan 3 '13 at 20:52

3 Answers 3

Assuming that you don't know the dynamic type of either side at compile time (for example the static type is the same as the dynamic type) and that you in fact want to compare two Expr objects by pointer or reference, then you are going to have to make two virtual calls (double dispatch) or use dynamic_cast.

It would look something like this:

class Expr {
public:
  virtual bool compare(const Expr *other) const = 0;
  virtual bool compare(const NumExpr *other) const { return false; }
  virtual bool compare(const AddExpr *other) const {return false;}
};

class NumExpr : public Expr {
  int num;
public:
  explicit NumExpr(int n) : num(n) {}
  bool compare(const Expr *other) const {
    return other->compare(this);
  }
  bool compare(const NumExpr *other) const {
    return num == other->num;
  }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
this particular solution requires that the Expr be aware of all derived types like NumExpr before hand... would require a forward declaration in the code... one would not be able to add new expressions without changing the code for mother Expr... –  user1055604 Dec 28 '12 at 19:52
    
This certainly avoids the dynamic_cast, but becomes unwieldy when there are a numerous subclasses and subverts the reason to form a class hierarchy in the first place. –  wcochran Dec 28 '12 at 20:04

There is the typeid Operator that can be used instead of dynamic_cast for the initial type matching.

(src)

share|improve this answer
    
Really just the same approach. –  wcochran Dec 28 '12 at 20:09

You can use RTTI.

class NumExpr : public Expr {
  int num;
public:
   NumExpr(int n) : num(n) {}
bool compare(const Expr *other) const {
if ( typeid(*other) != typeid(*this) )
     return false;
 else {
     NumExpr *e = static_cast<NumExpr*>(other);
     return num == e->num;
  }
  }
};
share|improve this answer
    
What is e? Doesn't compile, –  wcochran Dec 28 '12 at 20:07
    
result of static_cast, corrected –  Sammy Dec 28 '12 at 20:17
    
Using typeid and static_cast not really different than using dynamic_cast. –  wcochran Dec 31 '12 at 17:06
    
One difference between typeid and dynamic_cast is that dynamic_cast can find a subobject anywhere in the inheritance tree, but typeid will only tell you the most-derived type. So for most purposes, typeid is even worse than dynamic_cast. –  aschepler Jan 3 '13 at 23:08
    
Yes aschepler, dynamic_cast will succeed for a base type although the actual object is a subtype. So in the above code, if other is a subtype of NumExpr, say NumExprSpecial, dynamic_cast <const NumExpr*>(other) will succeed and an instance of NumExprSpecial and an instance of NumExpr may end up being equal. Unless that makes sense to your application?, typeid is a better solution. –  Sammy Jan 24 '13 at 18:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.