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I need to read the input from the console and put it into an array of chars. I wrote the following code, but I get the following error: "Segmentation Fault"

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {

    char c;
    int count;
    char arr[50];

    c = getchar();
    count = 0;
    while(c != EOF){
        arr[count] = c;
        ++count;
    }


    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);

}
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What if I want to print the current char in the loop and add the following: printf(arr[count]); I get segmentation fault again. –  user69514 Sep 10 '09 at 20:22
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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main() {
    char c;                /* 1. */
    int count;
    char arr[50];
    c = getchar();         /* 2. */
    count = 0;
    while (c != EOF) {     /* 3. and 6. and ... */
        arr[count] = c;    /* 4. */
        ++count;           /* 5. */
    }
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS); /* 7. */
}
  1. c should be an int. getchar() returns an int to differentiate between a valid character and EOF
  2. Read a character
  3. Compare that character to EOF: if different jump to 7
  4. Put that character into the array arr, element count
  5. Prepare to put "another" character in the next element of the array
  6. Check the character read at 1. for EOF

You need to read a different character each time through the loop. (3., 4., 5.)

And you cannot put more characters in the array than the space you reserved. (4.)

Try this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main() {
    int c;                 /* int */
    int count;
    char arr[50];
    c = getchar();
    count = 0;
    while ((count < 50) && (c != EOF)) {    /* don't go over the array size! */
        arr[count] = c;
        ++count;
        c = getchar();     /* get *another* character */
    }
    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);
}


Edit

After you have the characters in the array you will want to do something to them, right? So, before the program ends, add another loop to print them:

/* while (...) { ... } */
/* arr now has `count` characters, starting at arr[0] and ending at arr[count-1] */
/* let's print them ... */
/* we need a variable to know when we're at the end of the array. */
/* I'll reuse `c` now */
for (c=0; c<count; c++) {
    putchar(c);
}
putchar('\n'); /* make sure there's a newline at the end */
return EXIT_SUCCESS; /* return does not need () */

Notice I didn't use the string function printf(). And I didn't use it, because arr is not a string: it is a plain array of characters that doesn't (necessarily) have a 0 (a NUL). Only character arrays with a NUL in them are strings.

To put a NUL in arr, instead of limiting the loop to 50 characters, limit it to 49 (save one space for the NUL) and add the NUL at the end. After the loop, add

arr[count] = 0;
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For what it's worth, rather than use putchar() in a loop, it might be better to just use fwrite(arr, 1, count, stdout); –  Chris Lutz Oct 27 '09 at 4:19
    
Is there a way to dynamically allocate size of array? (if unknown number of input) –  Ir0nm Nov 13 '12 at 11:05
    
@Ir0nm: yes. You cam use realloc() inside the loop to keep growing the array as needed. –  pmg Nov 13 '12 at 12:56
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#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {

    int c;
    int count;
    int arr[50];

    c = getchar();
    count = 0;
    while( c != EOF && count < 50 ){
        arr[count++] = c;
        c = getchar();
    }


    return (EXIT_SUCCESS);

}

Notice the && count < 50 in the while loop. Without this you can overrun the arr buffer.

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ha that's simple. sorry i'm new to C, this is my first program. Thanks. –  user69514 Sep 10 '09 at 20:18
    
cool, enjoy learning C, its a great language! :) –  QAZ Sep 10 '09 at 20:40
    
This still won't work without "c = getchar();" somewhere in the loop. –  Andrew Bainbridge Sep 10 '09 at 23:02
    
Andrew: good point! :) –  QAZ Sep 11 '09 at 10:37
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I have a small suggestion.
Instead of having c = getchar(); twice in the program,
modify the while loop as follows,

while( (c = getchar()) != EOF && count < 50 ){
        arr[count++] = c;
}
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