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How can I correct the following so that I don't receive a syntax error in Microsoft SQL Server 2005?

UPDATE Emp E
SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
WHERE EmpID=1
AND NOT EXISTS(
   SELECT * FROM Emp 
   WHERE UserName=Left(E.FirstName,1)+E.LastName
)
share|improve this question
    
I'm not exactly sure what's wrong with this, but dependent sub-queries tend to be exceedingly slow. –  Powerlord Sep 10 '09 at 20:17
    
I've done this in the past but I seem to recall a code smell associated with the techniques described in the answers below. –  Mayo Sep 10 '09 at 20:20

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To alias the name you must use FROM:

UPDATE Emp 
SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
FROM Emp E
WHERE NOT EXISTS(   
  SELECT * FROM Emp    
  WHERE UserName=Left(E.FirstName,1)+E.LastName)

Or alias the sub-query:

UPDATE Emp 
SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
WHERE NOT EXISTS(   
  SELECT * FROM Emp E    
  WHERE E.UserName=Left(Emp.FirstName,1)+Emp.LastName)
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The first example worked! Yeah! UPDATE Emp SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName FROM Emp E WHERE NOT EXISTS( SELECT * FROM Emp WHERE UserName=Left(E.FirstName,1)+E.LastName) –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:27
    
And your second example worked, too! Yeah! –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:30
1  
I would use the alias E in the first example, Update E instead of Update Emp This prevents you from only highlighting the first two lines and updating the entire table by accident. –  HLGEM Sep 10 '09 at 21:39
    
@hlgem: Once bitten twice shy? :) –  Remus Rusanu Sep 10 '09 at 21:41
    
That's a good technique HLGEM. –  Phillip Sep 29 '09 at 2:17

Untested...

UPDATE E
SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
FROM Emp E
WHERE NOT EXISTS(   
                 SELECT * FROM Emp    
                 WHERE UserName=Left(E.FirstName,1)+E.LastName
                )
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah! This one worked too! –  Phillip Sep 10 '09 at 20:29

there are 2 syntaxes here. To use an alias as the target of the update you do the following:

UPDATE e
    SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
    FROM Emp e
    WHERE NOT EXISTS(
       SELECT * FROM Emp
       WHERE UserName=Left(E.FirstName,1)+E.LastName
    )
    AND EmpID=1
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If I'm understanding correctly, this is what you're trying to do. Though, I'm not sure the first part of the WHERE clause is really necessary unless there's a ton of rows...

UPDATE Emp
SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
WHERE UserName<>Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
AND EmpID=1
share|improve this answer

UPDATE Emp SET UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName WHERE NOT EXISTS ( SELECT * FROM Emp e WHERE e.UserName=Left(emp.FirstName,1)+emp.LastName )

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It's been a while since I've tried this syntax... but in SQL Server you can specify a from on an update.

UPDATE Emp SET 
   UserName = Left(FirstName,1)+LastName
FROM Emp e1
WHERE NOT EXISTS (
   SELECT * 
   FROM Emp e2
   WHERE e2.UserName=Left(e1.FirstName,1)+e1.LastName
)

EDIT: My syntax certainly runs but I'm not certain that it's correct. Regardless of whether or not it's right, I would suggest using the alias in the update statement just to ensure that others can better understand what you are doing.

UPDATE e1 SET 
...
FROM Emp e1
...
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