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Does anyone know where I'd be able to find the definitions for the html helper (LinkExtensions) in ASP.net MVC? I'm trying to create my own extension to the ActionLinks and I want to build it upon what already exists. The LinkExtensions (from metadata) only gives me the:

    public static string ActionLink(this HtmlHelper htmlHelper, string linkText, string actionName);
    //
    // Summary:
    //     Returns an anchor tag containing the virtual path to the specified action.
    //
    // Parameters:
    //   htmlHelper:
    //     The HTML helper.
    //
    //   linkText:
    //     The inner text of the anchor tag.
    //
    //   actionName:
    //     The name of the action.
    //
    //   routeValues:
    //     An object containing the parameters for a route. The parameters are retrieved
    //     via reflection by examining the properties of the object. Typically created
    //     using object initializer syntax.
    //
    // Returns:
    //     An anchor tag.

but nothing more. I want to know where and how the anchors are built?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

http://aspnet.codeplex.com/sourcecontrol/changeset/view/23011?projectName=aspnet#288011

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I already know that, but I was wondering where the hrefs and the links themselves are defined. –  Rio Sep 14 '09 at 15:37
    
@Rio: just follow the code... Or I'm not understanding your question. –  Mauricio Scheffer Sep 14 '09 at 17:23
    
Well each of the functions don't exactly show you how each ActionLink is being built? –  Rio Sep 23 '09 at 12:43
    
Just follow the code. Starting with the link I posted, you'll see that ActionLink ends up calling HtmlHelper.GenerateLink, so navigate there and see how that is implemented, etc. –  Mauricio Scheffer Sep 23 '09 at 13:31

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