Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm not sure if this would be invalid practice; or good practice. The reason I'm at a loss is should I be utilizing a property instead of a local variable?

My reasoning and goal; was a very basic detection for a local disk drive.

Some things I'd like to point out:

  • I didn't choose a boolean value because I'd like to be able to call this class to return the drive path. So that name that is retrieved from the method; is able to be Path Combined in some of the derived classes.

My example:

    public class Drive
    {
        // Variable:
        public string nameOfDrive;

        public Drive()
        {
            // Call Method.
            DriveName();
        }

        public string DriveName()
        {
            DriveInfo [] drives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();
            foreach (DriveInfo d in drives)
            {
                // Verify Valid 'C:' is Present.
                if (d.Name == @"C:")
                {
                    // Set Name:
                    nameOfDrive = d.Name;
                    // Return Result.
                    return d.Name;
                }
            }
            // Exception:
            throw new Exception("Unable to locate the C: Drive... Please map the correct drive.");
        }

    }
    /*
     * The above method and class contains a verification
     * for the 'C:' Drive.  Once the items are validated;
     * it will create a return variable for the 'C:'.  
     * Otherwise it will throw an Exception.
    */

Now this is where I'm unsure of what is better practice. Should I be using a property instead of public string nameOfDrive. Or am I really far off all together- is this not the best way to return a value that can be utilized in other classes? Or is it bad practice to reference directly to the member variable?

Second Example:

    public class Drive
    {
        private string nameOfDrive;
        public string NameOfDrive
        {
            get { return nameOfDrive; }
        }
        public Drive()
        {
            // Call Method.
            DriveName();
        }
        public string DriveName()
        {
            // Obtain Drive Information:
            DriveInfo [] drives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();
            foreach (DriveInfo d in drives)
            {
                // Verify Valid 'C:' is Present.
                if (d.Name == @"C:")
                {
                    // Set Name:
                    nameOfDrive = d.Name;
                    // Return Result.
                    return d.Name;
                }
            }
            // Exception:
            throw new Exception("Unable to locate the C: Drive... Please map the correct drive.");
        }
    }
    /*
     * The above method and class contains a verification
     * for the 'C:' Drive.  Once the items are validated;
     * it will create a return variable for the 'C:'.  
     * Otherwise it will throw an Exception.
    */

So that way it is marked as a Read Only and will ensure that it reads the proper value from the method?


Update:

I appreciate the answers; but why is it better practice?

  • Is it beneficial for security?
  • Just tidier?
  • More flexible

What makes it a better solution; that is what I'm attempting to understand.

share|improve this question
1  
You really need to cut down the code bloat from those samples. We don't need to see your usings, the namespaces, we don't need all that whitespace, the regions and redundant comments, etc. Particularly when comparing two code snippets, it's harder to see the differences when there's all this unrelated cruft to sort though. Even if you keep all of that in your actual code, filter it before posting it here. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 19:54
    
@Servy I fixed it. Also, example code or not, you do not need 20 blank lines in your code, nor random pointless regions and "custom" comment documentation conventions. You might want to take some of your code to codereview.stackexchange.com to learn more about what's wrong with your coding style –  Earlz Dec 28 '12 at 20:53

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although, it isn't necessarily bad practice, it isn't good either.

For the most part, fields should be used when you have a simple data class(usually with no real code involved, just a way to store some values). If you go beyond that level of complexity, you should usually have your class use properties. A few reasons:

  1. Converting from fields to properties later will break dependencies and require all code using your class to be recompiled
  2. Properties have more fine-grained control. From a quick glance at your use-case, it looks like you should have a getter that will automatically populate and cache the drive letter and make the default setter private so it's read-only
  3. Properties can be virtual. This means it's much easier for people to extend your class beyond what you first imagined possible.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that is a great explanation! –  Greg Dec 28 '12 at 21:20
    
I don't agree with your statement "For the most part, fields should be used when you have a simple data class". Microsoft and .Net is pushing to properties whenever possible, almost completely discouraging public fields. Take a look at automatic properties (new in 3.0), Entity Framework templates, etc. This is true for all the reasons you listed, as well as things like databinding and reflection. There is (just about) no reason to use public fields anymore in .Net –  EkoostikMartin Jan 2 '13 at 17:14
    
@EkoostikMartin yes, I use automatic properties and such. There are just some cases where I know I will never need the functionality of a property, usually in private nested classes which are only used to store a bit of data. However, even there, you're correct, fields are nearly pointless. Most everything that deals with reflection(serialization, etc) works exclusively or better when using properties rather than fields –  Earlz Jan 2 '13 at 18:38

You can use the Lazy class to do this. It's specifically designed to solve this exact problem of lazily initializing a value that can take some time to compute. You can give the Lazy object a method which is used to compute the value, the first time the value is requested it uses the function to generate the value, and all subsequent calls just return that first value. It also has the advantage of being thread safe (the function will only ever be called once, no matter how many people request the value before it's been generated, and they all wait until it's computed to return).

public class Drive
{
    private Lazy<string> nameOfDrive = new Lazy<string>(DriveName);

    public string NameOfDrive
    {
        get { return nameOfDrive.Value; }
    }

    private static string DriveName()
    {
        DriveInfo[] drives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();

        foreach (DriveInfo d in drives)
        {
            if (d.Name == @"C:")
                return d.Name;
        }

        throw new Exception("Unable to locate the C: Drive... Please map the correct drive.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for that explanation; that explains a little bit better as to why I would use the above method. –  Greg Dec 28 '12 at 20:27

I would use a read only property with a private member variable. This way it's easier to update the class if you ever change the way you look up the drive letter without breaking the calling code.

Why does your DriveName method return anything? Is it used publicly or is it just used to populate your NameOfDrive property? I would make it private and void if it's only used inside the class.

EDIT: Thinking about it, this also seems like an odd way of not only checking for the existence of a drive, but also checking the letter to begin with. Why do you require that the drive letter of the user be C:? The way the user has their machine set up shouldn't matter. They should be able to have their OS drive be Q: if they wanted to, and it shouldn't break your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, Crystal Reports generates a temporary directory on the local C:. If it isn't present it throws an exception. So as an exercise I figured I'd build a little checker. –  Greg Dec 28 '12 at 19:57
    
It is used to just generate NameOfDrive property. –  Greg Dec 28 '12 at 20:06

I would create a class (or even an extension) to extract the cdrive. Have the consumer throw the error depending on their needs.

By creating a generic method, that allows for the process to be reused depending on the situation and adheres to the use of object oriented principle of isolating concepts into unique objects.

void Main()
{

  if (Drive.AcquireCDrive() == null)
      throw new Exception("Unable to locate the C: Drive... Please map the correct drive.");

}

public class Drive
{
    public static DriveInfo AcquireCDrive()
    {
       return DriveInfo.GetDrives()
                       .OfType<DriveInfo>()
                       .Where (drive => drive.IsReady)
                       .FirstOrDefault( drive => drive.Name.Contains(@"C:"));
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
That is actually a really neat approach; I like that. –  Greg Dec 28 '12 at 20:19
    
Since he wants an exception when no options exist I'd go with First rather than FirstOrDefault. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:29

Probably a better practice would be to use a read only property, but lazy load it.

Note below, I made the DriveName() method private and did not call the DriveName() method in the constructor.

public class Drive
{
    private string nameOfDrive = null;

    public string NameOfDrive
    {
        get 
        {
            if (nameOfDrive == null)
                nameOfDrive = DriveName();
            return nameOfDrive; 
        }
    }

    public Drive()
    {    }

    private string DriveName()
    {
        DriveInfo[] drives = DriveInfo.GetDrives();

        foreach (DriveInfo d in drives)
        {
            if (d.Name == @"C:")            
                return d.Name;
        }

        throw new Exception("Unable to locate the C: Drive... Please map the correct drive.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can use the Lazy<T> class specifically to do this. Not only could you simplify the code a tad, but it would become thread safe (your code currently isn't). –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 19:58
    
@Servy are you speaking about my code, or EkoostikMartin? –  Greg Dec 28 '12 at 20:01
    
@Servy I don't think Lazy<T> makes the code simpler, considering the intended audience (original poster). Also don't think thread safety is a concern in this case. –  EkoostikMartin Dec 28 '12 at 20:11
    
@Greg Well, I was speaking to this answer, but since he's suggesting you use it it obviously applies to both. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:16
    
@EkoostikMartin Well, I've added an answer just to demonstrate what it'd look like. It seems simpler to me. It's certainly less code. Whether or not it really needs to be thread safe, getting it for free while doing less work seems appropriate since I don't know the current or future context of the method. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.