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I'm currently building my portfolio website.

The page I'm working on can be found here: http://www.infomaticfilms.com/jack/jrimg/g_and_d.htm.

It's far from finished as I don't want to move on until I fix this problem. This page will be a generic page for all the various project pages which means they will all have different heights. Rather than make individual pages for each project I'd like to make just one that I can use for all by merely deleting the content each time and re-saving the page. If you click on the Me or Contact link you can see the other pages to see the border. I read an article from Stack Overflow which has helped me get very very close to the solution. I have a problem with Firefox though which adds 1 pixel to the right hand border. Here's the HTML:

<div class="contentAndBorders">   
 <div class="borderLeft"></div>   
 <div class="mainContentProjectPage">
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>
 <p>Content goes here</p>   
</div>   
<div class="borderRight"></div> 
</div>

I'm looking to put the content into the div with the class of mainContentProjectPage. I need the divs with the classes of borderLeft and borderRight to expand with the height of mainContentProjectPage so the border appears continuous which is what they currently do. It's basically three columns. The first and third columns are the white borders to the left and right and the middle column is for the content. Here's the CSS:

.contentAndBorders {
      width: 950px;
      position: relative;
      overflow: hidden;
}
.mainContentProjectPage {
      float: left;
      background-color: #F55816;
      width: 100%;
      padding-left: 24px;
}
.borderLeft {
      float: left;
      background-color: #FFF;
      width: 1.3%;
      background-attachment: scroll;
      background-image: none;
      background-repeat: repeat;
      background-position: 0px 0px;
      position: absolute;
      left: 0px;
      height: 100%;
      margin: 0;
}
.borderRight {
      background-attachment: scroll;
      background-color: #FFF;
      background-image: none;
      background-repeat: repeat;
      background-position: 0px 0px;
      width: 1.3%;
      float: left;
      position: absolute;
      right: 0px;
      height: 100%;
      margin: 0;
}

I don't really understand how it works, just that it does. If anyone knows a better way of achieving the same result then I'd be very grateful as this is the final part of my site. My question is does anyone know how to get rid of the extra 1 pixel on the right hand border in Firefox? It looks perfect in Safari and Chrome. Any help and advice would be a life saver.

JSFiddle of code above

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2 Answers 2

Get rid of all your extra border-related code (i.e., remove your borderLeft and borderRight divs from your markup and css), and simply apply the following css to your projectPageWrapper div.

#projectPageWrapper { 
  border: 10px solid white;
  border-radius: 10px;
  -webkit-border-radius: 10px;
}
share|improve this answer

It works because of the position styles applied to the elements at different levels. Here is more information about that topic.

The wrapping element .contentAndBorders expands as its child element .mainContentProjectPage does. Because of this, the 100% height (which does not actually work like you think it does) absolutely positioned side elements expand to fill the vertical space.

Unless the spaces on the sides need to contain something other than a solid fill, this is probably not the way to go. Instead, follow box model principles, and use border-left and border-right in conjunction with padding to attain the desired look and layout.

If the side pieces require a pattern fill or contents, then you can use the absolutely positioned solution, but most of your floats are unnecessary and will probably cause more issues than they are worth.

Try:

.contentAndBorders {
      width: 950px;
      position: relative;
}
.mainContentProjectPage {
      background-color: #F55816;
      margin: 0 1.3%;
      padding: 10px;
}
.borderLeft, .borderRight{
      background-color: #FFF;
      width: 1.3%;
      position: absolute;
      top:0px;
      height: 100%; /* note that in non-webkit browsers this may actually represent the WIDTH of the parent element */
}
.borderLeft {
      left: 0px;
}
.borderRight {
      right: 0px;
}

Now, because the browser doesn't always know what to do when 1.3% doesn't divide to an even number of pixels, there may be slight discrepancies.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'm an idiot. I just set their widths to 12px and problem solved. Thankyou so much for responding. –  jack rutter Dec 30 '12 at 19:46

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