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Let's say I have 100 tasks that do something that takes 10 seconds. Now I want to only run 10 at a time like when 1 of those 10 finishes another task gets executed till all are finished.

Now I always used ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem() for such task but I've read that it is bad practice to do so and that I should use Tasks instead.

My problem is that I nowhere found a good example for my scenario so could you get me started on how to achieve this goal with Tasks?

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Where did you read that using the ThreadPool was bad practice? –  Jonathon Reinhart Dec 28 '12 at 20:01
    
I would suggest reading some articles and or previous Stackoverflow postings there are plenty of coded examples that others have tried and where answers are provided stackoverflow.com/questions/6192898/… do a google search like I have C# Stackoverflow ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem() –  DJ KRAZE Dec 28 '12 at 20:03
    
Do you want a method that blocks until all of the tasks are done, or do you want a method that returns a Task when all of the tasks are done? –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:06
    
It should block, just like ThreadPool does but with tasks. Some guys here on Stackoverflow told me on a code sample that Threadpool would be bad practice –  Matthias Dec 28 '12 at 21:42
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3 Answers 3

SemaphoreSlim maxThread = new SemaphoreSlim(10);

for (int i = 0; i < 115; i++)
{
    maxThread.Wait();
    Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            //Your Works
        }
        , TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning)
    .ContinueWith( (task) => maxThread.Release() );
}
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You have several options. You can use Parallel.Invoke for starters:

public void DoWork(IEnumerable<Action> actions)
{
    Parallel.Invoke(new ParallelOptions() { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10 }
        , actions.ToArray());
}

Here is an alternate option that will work much harder to have exactly 10 tasks running (although the number of threads in the thread pool processing those tasks may be different) and that returns a Task indicating when it finishes, rather than blocking until done.

public Task DoWork(IList<Action> actions)
{
    List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
    int numWorkers = 10;
    int batchSize = (int)Math.Ceiling(actions.Count / (double)numWorkers);
    foreach (var batch in actions.Batch(actions.Count / 10))
    {
        tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
            foreach (var action in batch)
            {
                action();
            }
        }));
    }

    return Task.WhenAll(tasks);
}

If you don't have MoreLinq, for the Batch function, here's my simpler implementation:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int batchSize)
{
    List<T> buffer = new List<T>(batchSize);

    foreach (T item in source)
    {
        buffer.Add(item);

        if (buffer.Count >= batchSize)
        {
            yield return buffer;
            buffer = new List<T>();
        }
    }
    if (buffer.Count >= 0)
    {
        yield return buffer;
    }
}
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Now I want to only run 10 at a time, MaxDegreeOfParallelism is only an upper bound. –  L.B Dec 28 '12 at 20:07
    
@L.B Well, technically, if the number of units of work isn't divisible by 10 then exactly ten isn't possible. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:08
    
No even with 100 works, it may end up running fewer Tasks. It depends on many parameters such as # of CPUs –  L.B Dec 28 '12 at 20:10
    
@L.B I'm aware of that. I was stating that even if you tried to be closer to exactly 10 you can't always be perfect, you can only be...closer. –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:12
    
@L.B Does the additional version I added satisfy you? –  Servy Dec 28 '12 at 20:15
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TPL Dataflow is great for doing things like this. You can create a 100% async version of Parallel.Invoke pretty easily:

async Task ProcessTenAtOnce<T>(IEnumerable<T> items, Func<T, Task> func)
{
    ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions edfbo = new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions
    {
         MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 10
    };

    ActionBlock<T> ab = new ActionBlock<T>(func, edfbo);

    foreach (T item in items)
    {
         await ab.SendAsync(item);
    }

    ab.Complete();
    await ab.Completion;
}
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