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I'm experimenting with data access in C#. I'm writing a class that has a Save(object o) method where it will cycle through each of the object's properties and match them to the database using attributes.

My problem is that my class needs to get the connection string, but I want the user to supply it. I don't want it to be limited to a config file, basically. Here's what I thought of thus far:

  • Firing an event before each connection where the user would supply the string via a custom EventArgs class (similar to how you can supply your own object instance to an ASP.NET ObjectDataSource via the ObjectCreating event)
  • A property in my data access class
  • A combination of both, where if the event has no subscribers, it goes with the property's value

I was just wondering what other possibilities there were and what would be the best strategy in this scenario?

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1  
I would hate having to write a separate event handler to provide something that was mandatory in the first place. I think your "property in my data access class" answer is best. Then on top of that, if you want, you can pass an optional (null) argument to Save(object o, string connStr = null) and if it's null then use the class property. –  Michael Bray Dec 28 '12 at 20:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An event would not be natural because your code would break if not exactly a single subscriber was present. Events are meant for use-cases where the number of subscribers does not matter to class raising the event.

Use a property or an interface (like IConnectionProvider) to inject the connection string. The interface version lends itself well to being used with a DI container.

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Could you elaborate on the interface idea? Seems interesting. –  Netfangled Dec 28 '12 at 20:17
    
@Netfangled provide the class that is responsible for saving with an instance of a class implementing that interface. That results in the Save method not having to know anything about how the connstr is obtained. The two components are decoupled.; Actually, if there is only ever a single implementation of that interface, you don't need an interface at all. Just use a normal class that has a GetConnectionString method. –  usr Dec 28 '12 at 20:19

Semi-agreeing with usr, you will want to create an IConnectionProvider regardless of which way you go.

However, I think it depends on how much flexibility you want to allow the developer with your class.

Will you force each instance of your class to have a global connection that will stay the same and be used for all method calls that need to access the db? If so, then your class needs to take IConnectionProvider in its constructor.

Do you want to alert the developer and give them the flexibility to change the connection when the state of your class changes? If so, then providing an Event may be a good option.

Is your class static or do you want to force the developer to provide a different connection with method call? Then, each method should take an IConnectionProvider.

You need to decide how much flexibility you want to allow with your class and make the choice based on that.

If you want to allow extreme amounts of flexibility and customization, you may want to look into lambda expressions. With them, you can allow the developer to provide a method that you will call at a certain point in your code. Using lambda expressions, I was able to consolidate code by writing generic database methods where the caller only has to provide the code to read the IDataReader which I setup for them and handle catching any exceptions as well as closing and disposing any of the database objects needed.

EDIT : Here is an example of what I did to consolidate my connection code.

    public static T ExecuteReader<T>(IDbConnection connection, string commandText, Func<IDataReader, T> readData) where T : class
    {
        IDbCommand command = connection.CreateCommand();
        command.CommandText = commandText;

        try
        {
            connection.Open();
            IDataReader reader = command.ExecuteReader();
            T returnValue = readData(reader); //Call the code provided by the caller and get the return object.

            reader.Close();
            reader.Dispose();

            return returnValue; //Return their return object.
        }
        finally
        {
            if (command != null)
            {
                command.Dispose();
            }
            if (connection != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    if (connection.State != ConnectionState.Closed)
                    {
                        connection.Close();
                    }
                }
                finally
                {
                    connection.Dispose();
                }
            }
        }
    }

Example Usage:

MyDataList.AddRange(
    Database.ExecuteReader<List<MyDataModel>>( //Tell ExecuteReader what type of object to return
    connection, //Pass in the connection
    commandString, //Pass in the command
    delegate(IDataReader reader) //This code is called from inside the ExecuteReader method.
    {
        List<MyDataModel> List = new List<MyDataModel>();
        while (reader.Read())
        {
            //Read each record, transform it into MyDataModel, then add it to the List.
        }
        return List;
    }
}));

The generic ExecuteReader method was created because the code for creating the command, opening the connection, and disposing all of it stays the same and gets replicated for every object. This prevents that unnecessary code replication. The only thing that really changes is how to transform the object from the IDataReader into the class so the caller of the ExecuteReader method is able to provide the code that will do their specific transformation.

This may not be true for you since you are mapping your object 1:1 and providing a way to automatically transform them, but in my case, I am not able to rely on that.

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I decided to go with the IConnectionProvider, but what you say with the lambda expressions seems interesting. Could you elaborate or give an example, please? I'm slightly confused as to what class you're referring to when the state of my class changes. The only state the data access class could possibly keep is a connection. –  Netfangled Dec 29 '12 at 15:37
1  
Without knowing your setup, it's difficult to say which class, but my answer was referring to whatever class is going to use the IConnectionProvider. If that class is simply acting as an in-memory data store, then there probably isn't any justification for making it an event. I will edit my answer with an example of the lambda expressions so you can get an idea as to how powerful they are, but if you don't need to offer this kind of flexibility, don't. It is always best to code for what you expect the user, or in this case the developer, to do. –  Aaron Hawkins Jan 2 '13 at 14:17

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