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First of all, this code, as ugly as it is, works, for all intents and purposes. However, it really makes me both sick and mad to look at.

For the lazy, the main portion of the code that sucks is this:

setTimeout(function() {
    toggle(); //off
    setTimeout(function() {
        toggle(); //on
        setTimeout(function() {
            toggle(); //off
            setTimeout(function() {
                toggle(); //on, stays for stallTime
                setTimeout(function() {
                    toggle(); //off
                    callback();
                }, stallTime);
            }, 300);
        }, 300);
    }, 300);
}, 300);

I would, of course, love to control my animations just by changing the CSS class on an element. However, transitionend and webkitTransitionEnd and the like are not reliable in the least. Am I forced to resorting to this kind of hideous code? Ideally I'd like to be able to set a variable number of "flashes", but this code is too stodgy for that.

Please rescue me from my filth.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you set a loop to do this instead...? –  Jeremy Dec 28 '12 at 20:13
    
because it needs to be timed, and the css is controlling the transition timing. a loop would just fire it a bunch of times without waiting. –  Jason Dec 28 '12 at 20:15
    
not if you do something like this –  Jeremy Dec 28 '12 at 20:16
    
That's gratuitous and unnecessary (and kinda funny). Are you familiar with Common.js Deferred objects? jQuery has them (and the subset Promise). Check it out. Funny, this one particular pattern (deferred objects/promise/futures) keeps coming up today. –  Jared Farrish Dec 28 '12 at 22:45
    
Yes, I'm familiar with deferreds. The problem is, this is a timing issue that requires a timeout or interval. –  Jason Dec 28 '12 at 23:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
var count = 5;
var i = setInterval(function() {
    toggle();
    count--;
    if(count == 0) {
        clearInterval(i);
        callback();
    }
}, 300);
share|improve this answer
    
brilliant. this is an obvious answer that i should have known. i blame it on the holidays. thank you! –  Jason Dec 28 '12 at 20:24
    
Nile's is shorter though. :) –  Dark Falcon Dec 28 '12 at 20:26
    
I'd also recommend it because it doesn't use intervals. You could also use a recursive function. –  Jeremy Dec 28 '12 at 20:28
    
Is there a problem with using intervals? –  Dark Falcon Dec 28 '12 at 20:28
1  
Thanks. The first link was instructive. The second link seemed to be written by someone who misunderstands the basic concept of variable manipulation in Javascript, so not quite so helpful. :) –  Dark Falcon Dec 28 '12 at 20:36

To avoid setInterval, I wrote a recursive function:

// link.addClass('hover'); //on - no longer needed

flash = function(count) {
    if (count > 1) {
        setTimeout(function() {        
            toggle();
            flash(count - 1);
        }, 300);
    } else {
        setTimeout(function() {
            toggle(); //off
            callback();
        }, stallTime);            
    }                
}

flash(6); // 2 * the number of flashes.
share|improve this answer
    
So... Let's avoid a setInterval by using two setTimeouts. Interesting... –  Jared Farrish Dec 28 '12 at 22:49
    
@JaredFarrish No... CAbbott's code doesn't do what DarkFelcon's did. If DarkFelcon's did the same, he'd also need two setIntervals (or one setInterval and one setTimeout). All CAbbott did was make it exactly what the OP was originally asking for. DarkFelcon didn't, if you look close enough. There's no stallTime timer in the accepted answer. –  Jeremy Dec 28 '12 at 23:44
    
@Nile - I don't think you require two separate setTimeouts to get that done. Is there something you can indicate to help me see what I'm missing? There aren't two setTimeouts running at once. So...? –  Jared Farrish Dec 28 '12 at 23:50
1  
@JaredFarrish Something like this would do the same with only one timeout. Also this if you don't feel like cluttering the global scope –  Jeremy Dec 28 '12 at 23:59
    
@Nile - This was a contrived example of a single setTimeout being used for a question earlier today. I'm not sure why, but I can sit for hours and fiddle with obscure ways of calling setTimeout. It's just a matter of how the code is structured, though, and as I said in my comment below the question, it's as funny as it is absurd. –  Jared Farrish Dec 29 '12 at 0:08

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