Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a strlen function in C but it doesn't work.

int strlen(char*string)
{
    int length=0;
    while(length[string]!='0')
    {
        ++length;
    }
    free(string);
    return length;
}

It keeps on crashing no matter how many times I run the compiler. Whats wrong with my code?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by WhozCraig, Kerrek SB, Jens Gustedt, Eitan T, Jonathan Leffler Dec 29 '12 at 1:31

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

14  
length[string]? Just because it works, doesn't mean you should do it! –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 28 '12 at 20:48
9  
Any specific reason you're free()ing a string you likely never allocated? –  WhozCraig Dec 28 '12 at 20:48
14  
Why do you think that recompiling it would fix a programming error? –  wallyk Dec 28 '12 at 20:50
10  
C strings are not terminated with a 0 digit, they are terminated with a 0 byte. –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 20:51
10  
Erroneous free() call in code posted by an OP named "malloc" just makes me laugh. sry. –  WhozCraig Dec 28 '12 at 20:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You're probably freeing memory the function doesn't own.

For example:

strlen("42");

would crash because "42" is a string literal - you can't modify it.

Note that '0' is not the terminating character for a string, but the actual '0' character. Use either '\0' or 0.

Remove the free and it should work.

I'd also go with the more idiomatic string[length], which, beware, is illegal if string == NULL - so a null check is in order there.

share|improve this answer
6  
Also, '\0'. [filler] –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 28 '12 at 20:48
    
Worse yet, free() is probably being applied to memory that was never malloc'd or dynamically allocated, a very bad thing to do. –  wallyk Dec 28 '12 at 20:49
    
@sftrabbit true, missed that. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 28 '12 at 20:50
    
Wow, thats a fast (and complete) answer. –  Marcus Riemer Dec 28 '12 at 20:51
    
I disagree about the “a null check is in order there” part of the answer. The strlen function expects a pointer to a zero-terminated string. NULL is only one out of billions of invalid inputs. Testing for this particular invalid input increases boilerplate for little advantage. If what you want is a safe language, then use that (in the implementation of such a language, the NULL test will typically be unnecessary). C with NULL tests everywhere is still unsafe, it's unpleasant to read because it is diluted, and all the checks can even make it slower than the safe, optimizable counterpart. –  Pascal Cuoq Dec 28 '12 at 22:13

Your while loop should not be comparing against '0'.
'0' (ascii) is value 48!

Strings don't end with 48.
Strings end with 0.

You should be doing:

while(length[string] != 0)

(and all the other answers and comments about other problems in your code are also accurate)

share|improve this answer
1  
There's no reason why '0' should be 48. It could be, or it could not be, but that's completely irrelevant. –  Kerrek SB Dec 28 '12 at 20:52
7  
@KerrekSB: Does it matter what '0' is? It is WRONG, regardless of its value. (It is most likely 48 on most any system this guy is using) –  abelenky Dec 28 '12 at 20:54

Never mind, when I got rid of free and '0' it works!!

int strlen(char*string)
{
    int length=0;
    while(length[string]!='\0')
    {
        ++length;
    }
    return length;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Except it won't return the length of the string. –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 20:51
6  
No, read the answers, please... –  jrok Dec 28 '12 at 20:52

It crashes because I'm guessing the pointer wasn't assigned to any dynamically-allocated object (object created with malloc). Just because it's a pointer does not guarantee the fact that it was assigned to something allocated with malloc and therefore must be freed. Pointers can point to objects (not necessarily dynamically-allocated ones) and in this case I'm assuming the pointer is set to a string literal ("Hello World"). The pointer and its point-ee are allocated on the stack and need not be deleted. free is unnecessary in this case because they both will be destructed at the end of their respective scopes. Moreover, anything you create with malloc must be deleted/freed or you risk a memory leak. And otherwise freeing a pointer not assigned to something made with malloc causes undefined behavior which may include a crash.

share|improve this answer

Where does it crash? And why do you free the pointer you receive? That way you are not allowed to do anything with the string after retrieving its length with your function.

Or, if you are calling free on a chunk of memory that wasn't allocated using malloc, on the stack or whatever, you are in the terrain of undefined behaviour and should be glad it crashes.

Specifically "testing" your method with an invocation like strlen("test") will crash your program, as the char* wasn't allocated using malloc.

share|improve this answer

Try to use

while(string[length]!=0)
share|improve this answer
1  
See abelenky's answer. –  user166390 Dec 28 '12 at 20:51
1  
Both are equivalent, but it's a fair suggestion. –  Luchian Grigore Dec 28 '12 at 20:52