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I ran a right folding (:\) on a List of String, which caused a stack overflow. But When I changed it to use a left folding (/:), it worked fine. Why?

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Incidentally, if you must fold from the right, consider reversing and folding from the left (then reversing again if necessary)--you use the heap instead of the stack that way (but it's slower for small lists). –  Rex Kerr Dec 28 '12 at 21:59
    
@RexKerr On TraversableOnce, def foldRight[B](z: B)(op: (A, B) => B): B = reversed.foldLeft(z)((x, y) => op(y, x)). Isn't there a heuristic to punt to /:? –  som-snytt Dec 29 '12 at 0:41
    
Most of time, it makes no necessity to use right folding, so I can choose to use left folding safely. Thanks, guys. –  Qi Qi Dec 29 '12 at 21:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Fold are a general set of commonly used functions which traverse recursive data structures and typically result in a single value (reference). On sequences and lists, FoldLeft (in a general sense) is tail-recursive and as such, it can be optimized. FoldRight is not tail-recursive and thus can not be tail-call optimized. It does potentially have the benefit of being able to be applied to infinite series however.

The implementation of foldLeft and foldRight from the scala libraries (pirated from @dhg's answer) reflect this optimization/lack-there-of. foldLeft has been manually tail-call optimized using a while loop. foldRight can not be.

override /*TraversableLike*/
def foldLeft[B](z: B)(f: (B, A) => B): B = {
  var acc = z
  var these = this
  while (!these.isEmpty) {
    acc = f(acc, these.head)
    these = these.tail
  }
  acc
}

override /*IterableLike*/
def foldRight[B](z: B)(f: (A, B) => B): B =
  if (this.isEmpty) z
  else f(head, tail.foldRight(z)(f))

I believe there is a section in Programming in Scala, Second Edition by Odersky, Spoon, Venners on folds which describes how foldLeft on Lists is tail-recursive while it may be possible to foldRight on infinite lists. Unfortunately, I do not have it on me at the moment in order to provide page numbers, etc. If not, it isn't very difficult to prove this.

See also the section of folds in Learn You a Haskell for Great Good by Miran Lipovača

Back when we were dealing with recursion, we noticed a theme throughout many of the recursive functions that operated on lists. Usually, we'd have an edge case for the empty list. We'd introduce the x:xs pattern and then we'd do some action that involves a single element and the rest of the list. It turns out this is a very common pattern, so a couple of very useful functions were introduced to encapsulate it. These functions are called folds.

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artima.com/pins1ed/working-with-lists.html#16.7 though maybe you mean it was improved for 2nd ed. –  som-snytt Dec 28 '12 at 23:28
    
hrmmm, I don't see the part I'm thinking of. I read the 2nd edition, but I read it ~ 2 years ago, followed shortly by "Learn You a Haskell..." so it's possible I combined the two in my head. –  drstevens Dec 28 '12 at 23:31

Since the source is open, you can actually see the implementations in LinearSeqOptimized.scala:

override /*TraversableLike*/
def foldLeft[B](z: B)(f: (B, A) => B): B = {
  var acc = z
  var these = this
  while (!these.isEmpty) {
    acc = f(acc, these.head)
    these = these.tail
  }
  acc
}

override /*IterableLike*/
def foldRight[B](z: B)(f: (A, B) => B): B =
  if (this.isEmpty) z
  else f(head, tail.foldRight(z)(f))

What you will notice is that foldLeft uses a while-loop while foldRight uses recursion. The loop strategy is very efficient but recursion requires pushing a frame on the stack for every element in the list (as it traverses to the end). This is why foldLeft works fine but foldRight causes a stack overflow.

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It makes sense. Thanks! –  Qi Qi Dec 28 '12 at 20:54
    
Yes, it is. The list of strings only has 6000 more elements, a right folding then crashes a stack. –  Qi Qi Dec 28 '12 at 20:59

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