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I have the code:

unsigned char *myArray = new unsigned char[40000];

char pixelInfo[3];
int c = 0;
while(!reader.eof()) //reader is a ifstream open to a BMP file
{
    reader.read(pixelInfo, 3);
    myArray[c] = (unsigned char)pixelInfo[0];
    myArray[c + 1] = (unsigned char)pixelInfo[1];
    myArray[c + 2] = (unsigned char)pixelInfo[2];
    c += 3;
}
reader.close();

delete[] myArray; //I get HEAP CORRUPTION here

After some tests, I found it to be caused by the cast in the while loop, if I use a signed char myArray I don't get the error, but I must use unsigned char for the rest of my code. Casting pixelInfo to unsigned char also gives the same error.

Is there any solution to this?

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3  
The curse of the !eof() condition returns. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 28 '12 at 21:16
1  
And you are certain you haven't written over the boundry of the array? –  StoryTeller Dec 28 '12 at 21:20
    
OK, you're the guinea pig. Can you please tell us all why you think that !reader.eof() is a sensible condition? Please explain your reasoning in detail, or your source of information. It seems that every person who dabbles in C++ gets this wrong, and I'm really curious to figure out where this universal misconception comes from. –  Kerrek SB Dec 28 '12 at 21:21
1  
In this case there are two problems. (1) checking reader.eof() is a poor way to detect the end of the stream (2) the end of the stream is not the right termination condition to begin with -- reading the expected number of pixels is –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 21:22
    
I don't have much experience with C++, and all tutorials I've been reading about parsing a BMP file went like that so I just went along... myArray isn't fixed at 40000, I wrote that for easier reading, I get the array bounds after reading the file header, so I'll change it for the expected number of pixels, it is really more logical. Thanks. –  Daniichi Dec 28 '12 at 21:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is what you should do:

reader.read((char*)myArray, myArrayLength); /* note, that isn't (sizeof myArray) */

if (!reader) { /* report error */ }

If there's processing going on inside the loop, then

int c = 0;
while (c + 2 < myArraySize) //reader is a ifstream open to a BMP file
{
    reader.read(pixelInfo, 3);
    myArray[c] = (unsigned char)pixelInfo[0];
    myArray[c + 1] = (unsigned char)pixelInfo[1];
    myArray[c + 2] = (unsigned char)pixelInfo[2];
    c += 3;
}

Trying to read after you've hit the end is not a problem -- you'll get junk in the rest of the array, but you can deal with that at the end.

Assuming your array is big enough to hold the whole file invites buffer corruption. Buffer overrun attacks involving image files with carefully crafted incorrect metadata are quite well-known.

Do not rely on the entire file content fitting in the calculated buffer size.

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The code example won't work for me because I wrote a simplified version, I actually change a value here and there during the loop. But the information about the buffer overrun is greatly appreciated, I'm going to work on something to make it safer. –  Daniichi Dec 28 '12 at 21:38
    
@Danicco: Well then, you can write your loop as while (c < myArrayLength). The important thing is that I/O errors give garbage results, but don't cause crashes. Overrunning the array, on the other hand, is a crash or even worse, a security vulnerability. So I know which condition the loop needs to check for. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 22:16
    
This is what I did, it's working perfectly fine now, thanks for the additional info too! –  Daniichi Dec 28 '12 at 23:12

reader.eof() will only tell you if the previous read hit the end of the file, which causes your final iteration to write past the end of the array. What you want instead is to check if the current read hits the end of file. Change your while loop to:

while(reader.read(pixelInfo, 3)) //reader is a ifstream open to a BMP file
{
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, "to check if the current read hits the end of file" isn't what he wants at all. Stopping when he hits the end of the pixel array is what he needs. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 21:23

Note that you are reading 3 bytes at a time. If the total number of bytes is not divisible by 3 (not a multiple of 3) then only part of the pixelInfo array will actually be filled with correct data which may cause an error with your program. You could try the following piece of not tested code.

while(!reader.eof()) //reader is a ifstream open to a BMP file
{
   reader.read(pixelInfo, 3);
   for (int i = 0; i < reader.gcount(); i++) {
       myArray[c+i] = pixelInfo[i];
   }
   c += 3;
}

Your code does follow the documentation on cplusplus.com very well since eof bit will be set after an incomplete read so this code will terminate after your last read however, as I mentioned before the likely cause of your issue is the fact that you are assigning likely junk data to the heap since pixelInfo[x] might not necessarily be set if 3 bytes were not read.

share|improve this answer
    
Still abusing eof(), and still happily overflows the array and trashes the heap. –  Ben Voigt Dec 28 '12 at 22:17
    
@Ben Voigt I am not sure how I am abusing eof. It checks whether a bit is set which read does in the event of a failure. In the case of an incomplete read then the array will still get assigned and it will exit on the next iteration. If the array finished reading the last 3 bytes then the next iteration will try to read another 3 bytes and it will fail and cause the next eof check to fail. –  Jason Zhu Dec 28 '12 at 22:40
    
To answer my own question: parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/istream-and-eof.html –  Jason Zhu Jan 7 '13 at 16:15

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