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David Shwartz helped me alot and now it kinda works... do you have any idea for more elgant way to parse the input, if the input consists more than 2 numbers to add which need to be processed by the child ? I want the child to get only two integers so that's why I created the shared memory so the father will send the child the result(shared memory) + another integer.

Thank you all.

 #include <sys/types.h>
 #include <sys/ipc.h>
 #include <sys/shm.h>
 #include <string.h>
 #include <signal.h>
 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>

 volatile int *shared=0;
 int shmid;

 int  main()
 {

 char  line[256];
 int readByte;


 int fd[2]; //pipe to son, who processes addition
 int pid;

 shmid=shmget ( IPC_PRIVATE, sizeof(int) , 0600 );

 shared=shmat ( shmid, 0 , 0);


 if ( pipe(fd) )
 {
   perror("pipe");
   exit(-1);
 }

 pid=fork();

 if (pid!=0) // father
 {
     close (fd[0]);

     readByte=read(0, line, 256);
     line[readByte-1]='\0';
     printf("%d",readByte);

     int arr[2];
     int i=0;
     int j=0;
     int flag=0;
     char num[10];

     while (i<readByte)
     {
         if (line[i]=='+' )
         {
           i++;
           j=0;
           flag=1;
         }

          while (line[i]!='+' && line[i]!='\0')
          {
            num[j]=line[i];
            i++;
            j++;
           }
            num[j]='\0';

       if (flag==0)
           arr[0]=atoi(num);
       else
       {
           arr[1]=atoi(num);
           i++;
       }

     }
       printf("first %d\n",arr[0]);
       printf("sec %d\n",arr[1]);

        write(fd[1], &arr, sizeof(arr));
        wait(NULL);

       printf ( "%d\n" , *shared );

 }
 else
     // son
     {
       int arr[2];
       int sum;

       readByte = read(fd[0], &arr, sizeof(arr));

       printf("son printing: %d\n",arr[0]);
       printf("son printing: %d\n",arr[1]);

       sum =arr[0]+arr[1];
        *shared=sum;

       close (fd[0]);
       shmdt ( (const void *) shared );
     }

 shmdt ( (const void *) shared );
 shmctl ( shmid , IPC_RMID , 0 );

 close(fd[1]);

 return 0;

}

share|improve this question
    
The variable shared isn't shared, the shared memory area is shared. You need to change something inside the shared memory area. –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 21:46
    
Also, you throw away the result of shmat, which doesn't help either. –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 21:56

1 Answer 1

You throw away the return value of shmat. And you expect shared to be shared, but it's just a regular variable. Also, you need to prevent the compiler from optimizing away accesses to the shared memory. Here it is with all the fatal bugs fixed:

#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/ipc.h>
#include <sys/shm.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

volatile int *shared;
int shmid;

int main()
{
    int s,i;

    shmid=shmget ( IPC_PRIVATE, sizeof(int), 0600 );

    shared=shmat ( shmid, 0 , 0);
    *shared=100;

    printf ( "%d\n" , *shared);
    if ( fork()==0 ) // son
    {
        *shared=1000;
        shmdt ( (const void *) shared );
    }
    else // father
    {
            wait ( &s );
            printf ( "%d\n" , *shared);
            shmdt ( (const void *) shared );
            shmctl ( shmid , IPC_RMID , 0 );
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Each process has the shared memory segment attached before the fork, so they each need to detach it afterwards. (Actually, the 'son' will implicitly detach it when it terminates, so that's not really needed.) The cast is needed to avoid a warning about volatile. –  David Schwartz Dec 28 '12 at 22:22
    
There are many, many bugs in your code. I'd suggest either using a debugger to analyze the core file or adds lots of printf statements to your code to see where it goes off the rails. –  David Schwartz Dec 29 '12 at 1:03

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