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I have an expression visitor translating the expression to a url format. But it only converts the expression called at last. For example, if I call my collection like this:

NetworkAccountStorage.Where<NetworkAccountModel>(x => x.ID + 1 > 0).Select(x => x.Name).Distinct()

Distinct would be the only expression visited. How to solve this?

protected override Expression VisitMethodCall(MethodCallExpression m)
    {
        if (m.Method.DeclaringType == typeof(Queryable) && m.Method.Name == "Where")
        {
            sb.Append("$filter=");
            //this.Visit(m.Arguments[0]);
            //sb.Append(") AS T WHERE ");
            LambdaExpression lambda = (LambdaExpression)StripQuotes(m.Arguments[1]);
            this.Visit(lambda.Body);
            return m;
        }
        else if (m.Method.DeclaringType == typeof(Queryable) && m.Method.Name == "Select")
        {
            sb.Append("$select=");
            LambdaExpression lambda = (LambdaExpression)StripQuotes(m.Arguments[1]);
            this.Visit(lambda.Body);
            return m;
        }

        throw new NotSupportedException(string.Format("The method '{0}' is not supported", m.Method.Name));
    }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you need to recurse. Distinct takes a this parameter which is the .Select call etc.

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But what Property has to be recursed? –  Marco Klein Dec 28 '12 at 22:09
    
The expression that is bound to the first parameter of Distinct. Sadly I have no example lying around and no time to make one –  sehe Dec 28 '12 at 22:23
    
found it. I just had to visit Arguments[0] –  Marco Klein Dec 28 '12 at 22:27
1  
@MarcoKlein I recommend that you do not manually visit everything. Take a look at my answer. This thing is automated for you. –  usr Dec 28 '12 at 22:27

You need to recurse by calling the base method that you overrode:

base.VisitMethodCall(...);
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Good point. This thing ought to be simple, and it is –  sehe Dec 28 '12 at 23:29
    
So you think this would be correct? m = m.Update(m.Object, m.Arguments); return base.VisitMethodCall(m); –  Marco Klein Dec 29 '12 at 13:11
    
Modifying m has no effect - it is a local variable (a parameter). It is your private copy. Try this (and if it doesn't work right away, you need to fix it somehow): return m.Update(base.Visit(m.Object), m.Arguments.Select(x => base.Visit(x)));. Not sure what you call Update for but it must have a reason. –  usr Dec 29 '12 at 13:14
1  
You're right. This was sufficient: base.VisitMethodCall(m); –  Marco Klein Dec 29 '12 at 14:03

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