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My struct named Table holds an array of a struct named Object. Object holds a pointer to another Object. I want to make two methods - one that frees an Object and one that frees a Table when pointers to these structs are given (ObjectP and TableP respectively):

This is my current naive implementation which absolutely doesn't work since valgrid is spitting warnings all over the place (i'm really new to c coming from Java):

/*
 * Represents a linked list containing a key value
 */
typedef struct Object {
    void *key;
    struct Object *top;
    struct Object *next;
    Boolean originalCell;
} Object;

/*
 * Represents a table that stores keys based on a given object's hash
 */
typedef struct Table{
    Object *linkedObjects;
    size_t size, originalSize;
    HashFcn hfun;
    PrintFcn pfun;
    ComparisonFcn fcomp;
    Boolean wasDuplicated;
} Table;

void FreeObject(ObjectP object)
{
    free(object);
}

void FreeTable(TableP table)
{
    free(table);
}

How should i properly free these structs?

EDIT:

This is how i allocated the variables:

ObjectP CreateObject(void *key)
{
struct Object *object = (struct Object*) malloc(sizeof(struct Object));
...
}

TableP CreateTable(size_t tableSize, HashFcn hfun, PrintFcn pfun, ComparisonFcn fcomp)
{
    struct Table *table = malloc(sizeof(Table));

    if (table==NULL)
    {
        ReportError(MEM_OUT);
        return NULL;
    }

    table->linkedObjects = NULL;
    table->linkedObjects  = malloc(tableSize * sizeof(Object));
...
}
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What's an example of the warnings you're seeing? –  prprcupofcoffee Dec 28 '12 at 22:04
    
Can you show how you allocate them as well please? Typically deleting the objects should involve as many calls to free as construction had to malloc –  simonc Dec 28 '12 at 22:05
    
What is top? Is it the first element? –  Adam Sznajder Dec 28 '12 at 22:08
2  
Are you trying to drop objects separately from the table as a whole? If so, you have a major problem because for each object in the middle of the list that is deleted, there is a prior object that has a pointer to the object being deleted which becomes a dangling reference. You really need to find that object and fix its next pointer to point to the object that the next pointer of the object being deleted points to. If you're only deleting a whole table, then life is a whole heap easier! (Sorry pun intended.) –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 28 '12 at 22:08
    
@JonathanLeffler only deleting the whole table :) –  Tom Dec 28 '12 at 22:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I dislike your ObjectP and TableP notation; I'm going to make the pointers explicit with Object * and Table *.

From a comment, you're only concerned with deleting a whole table; that's good because it is a lot simpler than deleting an arbitrary object.

I'm assuming that the tableSize parameter to CreateTable() is stored in table->size.

static Object *FreeObject(Object *obj)
{
    Object *next = 0;
    if (obj != 0)
    {
        free(obj->key);   // If you allocated this
        next = obj->next;
        free(obj);
    }
    return(next);
}

void FreeTable(Table *tab)
{
    if (tab != 0)
    {
        for (size_t i = 0; i < tab->size; i++)
        {
            Object *next = tab->linkedObjects[i].next;
            while ((next = FreeObject(next)) != 0)
                ;
            free(tab->linkedObjects[i].key);  // If you allocated this
        }
        free(tab->linkedObjects);
        free(tab);
    }
}

The FreeObject() function is static because it is only intended for use by FreeTable(). It deletes the key, assuming that the key was allocated when the object was allocated; it captures the pointer to the next item in the list (which may be a null pointer), frees the object itself, and returns the pointer to the next item.

The FreeTable() function uses the FreeObject() function to release all the objects in the linked object lists hanging off the objects allocated in the array named linkedObjects, then deletes the array of objects, then deletes the table.

The key thing when freeing memory is to ensure that there is one free for each and every allocation, and only one free for each allocation. The value passed to free() must be a value from malloc(), calloc() or realloc(). Remember that a realloc() can change the address of a previous allocation, but the value from realloc() must be freed rather than the original allocation from malloc() or calloc().

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learned alot from your example, thanks! –  Tom Dec 28 '12 at 22:58

In order to delete the whole table (along with the objects), you need to walk your object graph and call free() for each block allocated via malloc, i.e. one Object or one array of these.

I understand your object graph looks like this:

Graph

Then the way to delete is:

void FreeObjectChain(Object* obj) {
    Object* curr = obj->next;
    while (curr) {
        Object* tmp = curr;
        curr = tmp->next;
        free(tmp);
    }
}

and

void FreeTable(Table* table) {
    for (int i=0; i<table->size; ++i) {
        FreeObjectChain( &(table->linkedObjects[i]) );
        // or simply FreeObjectChain( table->linkedObjects + i );
    }
    free(table->linkedObjects);
    free(table);
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're close, but I think there's a problem in the way you use FreeObjectChain(). The trouble is that you'll try to free each element of the array in table->linkedObjects separately (which is not a good idea). I think you need to pass table->linkedObjects[i].next to FreeObjectChain() to avoid the problem. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 28 '12 at 22:37
    
I'm not sure if I got you right, but please note that my FreeObjectChain starts from obj->next which should also avoid the problem you mentioned. (The way you're suggesting might look more natural though) –  Kos Dec 28 '12 at 22:56
    
OK — yes; you're right. That fixes the problem. You're OK; my comment is irrelevant/inaccurate. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 29 '12 at 0:16

I would try to do something like that:

void freeObject(Object* obj) {
    if (obj->next != NULL) {
        freeObject(obj->next);
    }
    if (obj->key != NULL) {
        free(obj->key);
    }   
    free(obj);
}

void freeTable(Table* table) {
     for (int i=0; i<table->size; ++i) {
         freeObject(&(table->linkedObjects[i]));
     }
     freeObject(table->linkedObjects);
     free(table);
}
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i usually don't like recursive functions, but it makes perfect sense here... assuming no loops... but if loops are possible you would have to also nil out obj->next –  Grady Player Dec 28 '12 at 22:32

FreeTable() must traverse the array and call free() on all the objects.

You should first know/learn how a computer works at low-level scope before attempting any code which deals with memory management.

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