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My input file is as below:

B0000001201012345519680415EN
B0000001201052323219921114
B0000001701233333319510802LN
B0000001701238999919460920
B0000000247974444419611219TN
B0000000246666666619910804
B0000000247777777719940329

I want to copy first record 'EN' to second record based on starting 9 bytes (B00000012). The expected output is:

B0000001201012345519680415EN
B0000001201052323219921114EN
B0000001701233333319510802LN
B0000001701238999919460920LN
B0000000247974444419611219TN
B0000000246666666619910804TN
B0000000247777777719940329TN

I need to write this in unix shell scripting

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good start with sample data and required output. But ... ;-) whatHaveYouTried.com ? Good luck. –  shellter Dec 28 '12 at 22:30
    
It looks like you also want to append other values too. Does B00000017 get LN and B0000024 get TN? –  squiguy Dec 28 '12 at 22:42
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closed as not a real question by Timo Geusch, competent_tech, Maerlyn, CodeNaked, François Wahl Dec 29 '12 at 2:11

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3 Answers

if you consider to do it with awk, this is a classical FIELDWIDTHS usage example:

awk -vFIELDWIDTHS="9 17 2" -vOFS="" '{if($1 in a)$3=a[$1];else a[$1]=$3}1' file
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That's an interesting (but non-standard, as in 'not in POSIX awk') extension — presumably it is found in GNU awk (it is not in Mac OS X / BSD awk, for example). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 29 '12 at 1:09
    
yes, gawk, I forgot mentioning about that.. –  Kent Dec 29 '12 at 1:10
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Using Perl:

perl -lape '$m = $1 if /([A-Z][A-Z])$/; s/(?<=[0-9]) *$/$m/' input

Output:

B0000001201012345519680415EN
B0000001201052323219921114EN
B0000001701233333319510802LN
B0000001701238999919460920LN
B0000000247974444419611219TN
B0000000246666666619910804TN
B0000000247777777719940329TN
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this only handles the EN case. –  Kent Dec 29 '12 at 0:49
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This would work with your input:

awk '!(x = substr($0,27)) { print $0 r; next } { r = x }1' file

However it would fail if a check of the first nine characters is required. To perform this check, try this:

awk 'x = substr($0,27) { a[substr($0,0,9)]=x } (y = substr($0,0,9)) in a && !x { print $0 a[y]; next }1' file

Results:

B0000001201012345519680415EN
B0000001201052323219921114EN
B0000001701233333319510802LN
B0000001701238999919460920LN
B0000000247974444419611219TN
B0000000246666666619910804TN
B0000000247777777719940329TN
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