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I'm trying to make a recursive method but it is losing its binding to this. Here is the simplest way to recreate my issue:

var Foo = function() {
    return {
        foo : 'foo',
        bar : function() {
            co​nsole.log(this.foo);
            setTimeout(this.bar, 500);
        }
    }​;
}
var foo = new Foo();
foo.bar();​

That will only run twice. The first time it will log foo to the console, and the second it will log undefined. Then of course, it won't run anymore because bar is no longer a property of this since I assume it was reset to the global object.

I tried var that = this in my bar method and referencing that.foo and that.bar but it doesn't change anything. I also tried var that = this above my return statement and the issue persists.

Expected result:

foo

foo

foo

foo

... and so on

Here is an example http://jsfiddle.net/k2hTJ/ which results in this:

foo

undefined

share|improve this question
    
Because this is overriden in the scope of the function. – Austin Brunkhorst Dec 28 '12 at 22:46
1  
We should come up with a name for the that = this, self = this conundrum that seems to haunt javascript developers on a daily basis. – Travis J Dec 28 '12 at 22:47
    
From the way your code looks, I deduce that you're well on your way to learning about the module pattern. Fantastic, but if you don't mind my being pedantic: in this case, a prototype method might be more suitable, because now you're creating a new function object for each new instance... all bar properties are separate objects that do exactly the same thing. That's not ideal. If you don't want to augment the proptotype, a closure will do just as well of course – Elias Van Ootegem Dec 28 '12 at 22:54
    
Can you post a fiddle of the above code using the module pattern for me? – Maverick Dec 28 '12 at 22:55
up vote 5 down vote accepted

setTimeout will call its function in the current scope, but with this as the global object.

The best way to work around this is to do something like:

var that = this;
setTimeout(function() {that.bar.apply(that);},500);
share|improve this answer
    
that.bar() may work the same – Alexander Dec 28 '12 at 22:54
    
@Alexander inside the anonymous function this scope has changed – Ibu Dec 28 '12 at 22:55
    
AH Thank you! I read about call and apply the other day and must have been too overwhelmed to remember it. – Maverick Dec 28 '12 at 22:56
    
@Ibu, Elias Van Ootegem, you better read again. There's no logic in the anonymous function – Alexander Dec 28 '12 at 22:57
    
@ibu: That doesn't matter: that.bar() calls the function object, referenced by bar in the context of that, whatever this references in the anonymous function is irrelevant. If it did matter, then someObject.bar() in the global scope would meant that this would point to the global object here, too (which it doesn't) – Elias Van Ootegem Dec 28 '12 at 22:57

This works:

var Foo = function() {
    return {
        foo : 'foo',
        bar : function() {
            co​nsole.log(this.foo);
            setTimeout(this.bar(), 500); //Add '()'
        }
    }​;
}
var foo = new Foo();
foo.bar();​
share|improve this answer
2  
It might well work, but it doesn't do the same thing: this calls the return value of the method after half a second, not the method itself – Elias Van Ootegem Dec 28 '12 at 22:50
2  
Congratulations. You just created an infinite loop! – Alexander Dec 28 '12 at 22:51
foo = {
    foo: 'bar',
    bar: function() {
        console.log(foo.foo);
        setTimeout(foo.bar, 500);
    }
};
foo.bar();​

This will also do the trick.

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