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I'm having trouble with std::list and memory leaks:

class AbstractObject
{
    public:
        virtual void Say() = 0;
}
class RealObject : public AbstractObject
{
    public:
        virtual void Say() { cout << "Real Obj Says..." << endl; } //Do I need the "virtual" keyword here too?
}
class AnotherRealObject : public AbstractObject
{
    public:
        virtual void Say() { cout << "Another Real Obj Says..." << endl; } //Do I need the "virtual" keyword here too?
}
class PackOfObjects
{
    public:
        std::list<AbstractObject*> objects; //list of pointers because it doesn't let me create a list of an abstract class
        void Say()
        {
            for(std::list<AbstractObject*>::iterator obj = objects.begin(); obj != objects.end(); obj++)
            {
                (*obj)->Say();
            }
        }
}
int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    PackOfObjs myObjs;

    RealObject objA;
    myObjs.objects.push_back(&objA); //This adds 1 memory leak
    AnotherRealObject objB;
    myObjs.objects.push_back(&objB); //This adds another 1 memory leak

    _gettch();
    _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
    return 0;
}

With just the PackOfObjs declared I have 2 memory leaks already, and they go away if I remove the std::list, and they increase by 1 for each address I add to the list. I tried clearing the list and some codes of removing all the objs pointed to before clearing, but at least 2 memory leaks still persist.

Since I didn't use any new (not even on the elements I add), I'm guessing the list itself creates some variables and don't delete them, how can I fix this?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks() runs, all the objects allocated inside of main still exist. You are calling _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks() too early. Instead, try this:

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    {
        PackOfObjs myObjs;

        RealObject objA;
        myObjs.objects.push_back(&objA); //This adds 1 memory leak
        AnotherRealObject objB;
        myObjs.objects.push_back(&objB); //This adds another 1 memory leak

        // <- all memory used by the list is freed here
    }
    _gettch();
    _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks();
    return 0;
}

I seem to remember that the recommended way of calling _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks is at the destructor of a global object. That may still be too early for other global objects, but at least then all objects created inside of main will have been destroyed already.

struct memory_leak_dumper
{
    ~memory_leak_dumper(){ _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks(); }
};
memory_leak_dumper _dumper; // this is a global object
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To check memory leaks you should use:

_CrtSetDbgFlag(_CRTDBG_ALLOC_MEM_DF | _CRTDBG_LEAK_CHECK_DF);

at the begining of your main

leaks will be checked at the program exit, now you check them when object are still on stack, so you have no leaks.

If you use virtual methods, you should add virtual destructor, although in your case it will not cause memory leaks but if your list would contain dynamically allocated object then virtual destructor in AbstractObject would be mandatory.

as for your question:

"//Do I need the "virtual" keyword here too?"

yes as long as your list<> is of base class pointer type

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To expand on K-ballo's answer, technically _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks inspects objects on the heap. While you didn't directly allocate anything on the heap, the std::list (and all containers that manage memory dynamically for that matter) do - otherwise dynamic size wouldn't be an option.

So no, there's technically no leak, but at the time you call _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks, dynamically allocated memory is still in use, without having been freed (yet).

Enclosing the std::list in a separate scope { ... } or calling _CrtDumpMemoryLeaks in the destructor of a global object as suggested should reveal no leaks.

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