Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This would be two questions in one

I have two pieces of codes, the only difference being the order between the declaration of int* a; and int cpt = 0; on lines 6 and 7.

Case 1:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    cout<<"begin"<<endl;
    int* a;
    int cpt = 0;
    cout<<"after init "<<a<<endl;
    *a = 2;
    cout<<"after assign"<<endl;
    cout<<a<<" "<<*a<<endl;
    cout<<"after cout"<<endl;
    int* b;
    *b = 2;
    cout<<b<<" "<<*b<<endl;
}

Output:

begin
after init 0x7fff6c97f05e
Bus error: 10

Case 2:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    cout<<"begin"<<endl;
    int cpt = 0;
    int* a;
    cout<<"after init "<<a<<endl;
    *a = 2;
    cout<<"after assign"<<endl;
    cout<<a<<" "<<*a<<endl;
    cout<<"after cout"<<endl;
    int* b;
    *b = 2;
    cout<<b<<" "<<*b<<endl;
}

Output:

begin
after init 0x7fff50e4ac00
after assign
0x7fff50e4ac00 2
after cout
Segmentation fault: 11

I'm wondering why the declaration order affects the error. The cpt variable isn't used anywhere, so why would it's declaration affect the error?

I'm also wondering why does the pointer "a" in the second case doesn't produce a segfault when referencing it when the "b" pointer does produce a segfault. They have the same declaration and same usage, why the difference?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The key is what you're doing (dereferencing an uninitialized pointer) results in undefined behavior, so you really can't expect anything in particular to happen, nor is there a reasonable/"standard-conformant" explanation for what the program does. It can be, however, the case, that the stack is set up in a way that in the second case, a points to a valid memory location by accident, but that's just a guess.

share|improve this answer
    
And a guess is really all you can do here, it being undefined and all. –  Donnie Dec 29 '12 at 7:21
    
I agree with that, the problem is that the accident repeats itself over and over again when executing the same code. An accident that is constant like that seems to be standard no? The "a" pointer is always initialized and doesn't produce a segfault while the "b" pointer always produce a segfault. –  Sam Dec 29 '12 at 7:27
    
@Sam No, it's just your OS that reusing the same memory region/allocation pattern for your process... –  user529758 Dec 29 '12 at 7:29
    
@Sam, Usually, undefined behaviour is pretty consistent when not making any changes to the code and just running it again and again (on the same platform, of course). Not much has changed that would screw it up logically, but keep in mind that basing undefined behaviour on logic can never work. For the most part, it will probably usually be the same when just rerunning it, but there's always a very open possibility for doing something else. –  chris Dec 29 '12 at 7:29
    
@ H2C03 With different adresses? –  Sam Dec 29 '12 at 7:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.