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Originally I had a form_for(@thing) corresponding to the create action in my ThingsController. It worked. Then, I decided to move the form to its usual place, /things/new.html.erb, and the form stopped rendering. It gave this error:

undefined method `model_name' for NilClass:Class

So I added @thing = Thing.new to the new action, and all was well. But notice—I didn't have to instantiate @thing when the form was located elsewhere in another controller's view.

This leaves me wondering why Rails makes the seemingly arbitrary decision to require instantiation in one place and not the other. Anyone Rails-heads have an answer?

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You might be calling the object somewhere in your new.html.erb. Post your code. –  Super Engineer Dec 29 '12 at 7:53
    
Right, it's being called in form_for(@thing). That's really all the code there is on the page, plus the form elements. –  enzo Dec 29 '12 at 8:11
    
I've never been able to pass form_for a nil object. Maybe you're missing something? –  Azolo Dec 29 '12 at 8:42
    
Originally you masn't move your _form.html.erb file, it should lay in /app/tings/_form.html.erb and be rendered from new.html.erb file (or edit.html.erb). –  itsnikolay Dec 29 '12 at 10:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Use form_for(:thing). It will detect an instance variable names @thing yet still work if it is nil.

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That's it! But with this, the form is POSTed to /things/new instead of /things, requiring the addition of :url=> {:action=>"create",:controller=>"things"},. I still prefer this way, as it is explicit and does not require the arbitrary instantiation of @thing. –  enzo Dec 29 '12 at 21:13
    
Would you say this is worth opening a ticket about? It's not a bug but seems like inconsistent behavior. –  enzo Dec 29 '12 at 21:49

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