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I want to get my Console.WriteLine() commands to appear in my "Output" window with my Debug.WriteLine() statements. I think I figured out how to do this once but I can't remember / find on google how to do it again. I seem to remember being able to do this in the app.config

I find plenty of instructions on how to bet console and debug statements to appear in the output of the Console, but not how to get them to appear in the "Output" window.

Does anyone know?

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up vote 17 down vote accepted

Basically the most simple solution look like this.

    public class ToDebugWriter : StringWriter
    {
        public override void WriteLine(string value)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(value);
            base.WriteLine(value);
        }
    }

and you must add to the initialization of program this line "Console.SetOut(new ToDebugWriter());"

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Good answer. Thanks! – Quinn Wilson Nov 12 '09 at 6:00
1  
Damn! I finally can se my NHibernate queries on Visual Studio! – andrerpena Apr 16 '10 at 3:04
    
Thanks! Why bother with the call to base.WriteLine? – Carl G Sep 15 '12 at 14:35
1  
@DGGenuine for this solution, you don't need it. – Avram Sep 23 '12 at 22:38
    
@Avram thanks. I see what you mean, though. Since ToDebugWriter is a subclass of StringWriter, it might be dangerous not to include call to base because ToDebugWriter should act like a StringWriter, including gathering written text for return in the ToString method. – Carl G Sep 24 '12 at 8:36

@Avram's answer has worked for me, except that the single overload in his code wasn't the one that log4net's ConsoleAppender was using on my system. (I'm interested in Console.SetOut so that log4net's ConsoleAppender outputs to Visual Studio's "Debug" output pane.) So I overrode all of StringWriter's Write and WriteLine methods accepting string, object, char[], etc. on the assumption that one or more of these was what ConsoleAppender was calling via Console.

This succeeded, and log4net logging now appears in my "Debug" pane.

I'm including the code below for the benefit of anyone with similar goals. (To be entirely safe, one could override the remaining StringWriter.Write and .WriteLine methods.) I've removed the calls to base because they appear to be unnecessary, and I think they just build up a large buffer inside StringWriter (usually accessed via that class's .ToString().)

namespace GeneralLibrary.Logging
{
    using System.Diagnostics;
    using System.IO;

    public class DebugWriter : StringWriter
    {
        public override void Write(string format, object arg0)
        {
            Debug.Write(string.Format(format, arg0));
        }

        public override void Write(string format, object arg0, object arg1)
        {
            Debug.Write(string.Format(format, arg0, arg1));
        }

        public override void Write(string format, object arg0, object arg1, object arg2)
        {
            Debug.Write(string.Format(format, arg0, arg1, arg2));
        }

        public override void Write(string format, params object[] arg)
        {
            Debug.Write(string.Format(format, arg));
        }

        public override void Write(object value)
        {
            Debug.Write(value);
        }

        public override void Write(string value)
        {
            Debug.Write(value);
        }

        public override void Write(char[] buffer)
        {
            Debug.Write(buffer);
        }

        public override void Write(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
        {
            Debug.Write(new string(buffer, index, count));
        }

        public override void WriteLine(string value)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(value);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(object value)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(value);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(string format, object arg0)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(format, arg0);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(string format, object arg0, object arg1)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(format, arg0, arg1);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(string format, object arg0, object arg1, object arg2)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(format, arg0, arg1, arg2);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(string format, params object[] arg)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(format, arg);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(char[] buffer)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(buffer);
        }

        public override void WriteLine(char[] buffer, int index, int count)
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(new string(buffer, index, count));
        }

        public override void WriteLine()
        {
            Debug.WriteLine(string.Empty);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If you can get hold of the stream for the output window you can use Console.SetOut() to redirect to it. However this approach doesn't appear to be possible.

System.Debug outputs to every TraceListener in its TraceListenerCollection. There is only one TraceListener registered initially which is the DefaultTraceListener. It does not make use of a stream object and instead uses native methods for output.

An approach that uses the Visual Studio API is probably the way to go.

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