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When I run this bit of code, Equation(10, 20) is output to the console:

public class Equation
{
    public int a;
    public int b;

    public override string ToString()
    { return "Equation(" + a + ", " + b + ")"; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(new Equation() { a = 10, b = 20 });

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

I'd like to support Equation instances being used in the test of an if so I allowed for implicit conversion to Boolean:

public class Equation
{
    public int a;
    public int b;

    public override string ToString()
    { return "Equation(" + a + ", " + b + ")"; }

    public static implicit operator Boolean(Equation eq)
    { return eq.a == eq.b; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        if (new Equation() { a = 10, b = 10 })
            Console.WriteLine("equal");

        Console.WriteLine(new Equation() { a = 10, b = 20 });

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

However, the trouble is, now when I use WriteLine on an Equation, it get's converted to a Boolean instead of printing using ToString.

How can I allow for implicit conversion to Boolean and still have WriteLine display using ToString?


update

This question is inspired by the Equation class in SymbolicC++. The code below illustrates that an Equation can be displayed via cout as well as used in the test of an if:

auto eq = x == y;

cout << eq << endl;

if (eq)
    cout << "equal" << endl;
else
    cout << "not equal" << endl;

So this is somehow possible in C++.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can't do it with a bool conversion but you can overload the true and false operators for Equation. Of course Equation won't be implicitly convertible to bool any more but you can still use it in if, while, do, and for statements and conditional expressions (i.e. ?: operator).

public class Equation
{
    public int a;
    public int b;

    public override string ToString()
    { return "Equation(" + a + ", " + b + ")"; }

    public static bool operator true(Equation eq)
    {
        return eq.a == eq.b;
    }

    public static bool operator false(Equation eq)
    {
        return eq.a != eq.b;
    }       
}

From your example:

if (new Equation() { a = 10, b = 10 })
    Console.WriteLine("equal"); // prints "equal"

Console.WriteLine(new Equation() { a = 10, b = 20 }); // prints Equation(10, 20)
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, you nailed it Mike. Thanks! –  dharmatech Dec 29 '12 at 9:44
    
While the Equations work in the statements you listed, it seems they don't work with the operators || and &&. Just thought I'd mention this for folks who are considering this option. –  dharmatech Dec 29 '12 at 22:46
    
@dharmatech As I said it's no longer convertible to Boolean. You could overload the & and | operators, as well but it would be of limited use since you still wouldn't be able to do something like eq && true. I actually agree with Jon's comment that this sort of thing is a little too clever and is likely to be confusing for both consumers of your code and future maintainers. –  mike z Dec 29 '12 at 23:03
    
See my comment to Jon regarding why I'm doing this. –  dharmatech Dec 29 '12 at 23:56

You can't, as far as I can tell. You could also provide a conversion to string... but that would then make the call ambiguous between WriteLine(string) and WriteLine(bool`).

Personally I'd strongly recommend that you ditch the implicit conversion to Boolean. Implicit conversions are almost always a bad idea. They make the code far more confusing, as well as leading to unintended overload changes as you've found.

(I'd also change your bracing style, but that's a different matter.)

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2  
You actually can) –  SergeyS Dec 29 '12 at 9:21
    
Jon, check out the answer by 'mike z'. This pretty much does what I'm looking for. Do you see any drawbacks to that approach? –  dharmatech Dec 29 '12 at 9:45
11  
@dharmatech: Well it doesn't answer the question as you put it, which is to keep the implicit conversion to bool. Personally I wouldn't overload the true and false operators either - I would keep things more explicit. I find that trying to be "cute" with operators like this usually leads to code which is harder to maintain. YMMV of course - but I would be very careful. –  Jon Skeet Dec 29 '12 at 9:57
    
I agree with the general guiding principle that the implicit conversion to Boolean is to be avoided. In this case, I'm trying to emulate a feature of the libraries SymbolicC++ and GiNaC. They both override == such that it creates an equation object. But, if the equation is used in a test, it should evaluate to a boolean. Generally a good idea? In most cases no. But these are computer algebra systems that are embedded in C++. For learning purposes, I wanted to see how to implement this feature in C#. –  dharmatech Dec 29 '12 at 23:55

This is because Console.WriteLine(bool) overload is called instead of Console.WriteLine(object). You can explicitly cast to object and required overload will be called:

Console.WriteLine((object)(new Equation() { a = 10, b = 20 }));

Or alternatively expliciltly call .ToString():

Console.WriteLine((new Equation() { a = 10, b = 20 }).ToString());
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