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How do you handle ugly code? Are you a code neat freak?

  • Do you feel that you have to clean up a file of source code before you can do anything useful?
  • Do you have the urge to refactor bad structure when you see it?

I admit that I'm often tempted to clean up other people's code when I have to modify the code anyway. Bad code is a pet peeve of mine.

How about you?

EDIT: I've read the discussion about subjectivity in the comments, and that subjectivity should be avoided in SO because the goal is to have neutral questions about technicalities. I've already answered questions here about Landau-O notation, C++ declaration and definitions, network addresses and such. But I feel like I'm being forced to move everything that might be subjective off SO. I would like those who think SO must be cleansed from all subjectivity to think a bit about why a community succeeds. To my mind, it's a mixture of hard facts and softer topics. If you read the current SO topics you will find quite some subjective topics (like best books wanted etc.). People like the format for poll-like questions, too. Why not support them? Those who want a completely objective SO could get a switch that filters subjective-tagged topics out in the first place.

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closed as not constructive by Robert Harvey Jan 18 '12 at 22:27

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I was so tempted to close this "question" but I held back... –  Jason Bunting Sep 26 '08 at 17:38
    
That's why I didn't close it. That said, there is a reason "close" is an option. I just wish people would read the FAQ before asking such subjective, discussion-board-like questions. The intent of SO is to provide useful answers to practical questions, not "Hey, I do this - do you do it too?!" –  Jason Bunting Sep 26 '08 at 17:42
    
@JasonBunting: If only we could hold back more and let the voting do it's job in general.. –  GEOCHET Sep 26 '08 at 17:42
    
@JasonBunting: Close should be a last resort. If you close more than one question a day, I would say you are doing it wrong. Just let voting and the offensive button do the work. –  GEOCHET Sep 26 '08 at 17:43
    
Even if a post is a bad post for some reason or other, it is probably not offensive. The Offensive flag is meant to be used only in extreme cases, like spam, hate speech, or abuse. So offensive button is not for offtopic. Close the thread is the best. –  Patrick Desjardins Sep 26 '08 at 17:49

28 Answers 28

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I try to focus my refactoring efforts on code that I think I will need to change in the near future. Most projects have tons of code, but most of is static for a long time. Refactoring introduces risk, so I want to make sure that the risk is balanced by the benefit.

If I know I'm going to change a peice of code for a fix or feature, I refactor first. I try to refactor to the point where the functionality change is simple, clear, and obviously correct.

If I've just changed a peice of code for fix or feature, I've usually made it a little uglier in the process. I also am more likely to come back to this area in the future. So, I refactor again.

When my refactorings hit many lines of code, I make a point of committing the refactoring separately. I'll put "REFACTORING" at the start of the description, so when I'm reading the change history, I know which ones to skip when looking for deliberate behavior changes (or to read, if I'm looking for accidental changes!).

When a change really hits a lot of lines (e.g., reformatting), I tell my teammates first, sync up to the latest, make the change, check in quickly, and tell my teammates to pick up the change. This reduces the hassle of merging.

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As much as I hate poorly indented code and ^Ms everywhere, I fight the urge. Reformatting code that is messy creates unusable diffs in version control, making it hard to understand what the change was. If something is so bad that I cannot deal with a reformat, I reformat it and check that in, indicating as such, and then do my work. This at least leaves a better trail of the changes.

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absolutely! I hate having to split multiple ideas out of someone elses commit. –  Jim Deville Sep 26 '08 at 18:09
1  
"reformatting code that is messy creates unusable diffs in version control" quite true, but isn't this a fault of the tools themselves? –  Jeff Atwood Sep 29 '08 at 23:03
1  
I commit the beatifying with a proper log message as it's own revision. This way my real changes can be diffed in a proper way. –  Mnementh Nov 7 '08 at 6:54

I find that neat code takes less time to understand so for me I see it as laziness and lack of caring on the part of a programmer who does not keep his/her code clean. I do usually start cleaning up code if it is something that I have to work on.

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I agree. To me, sloppy code implies that the writer didn't take care while writing it, and doesn't care if anyone is ever going to read it. That is not good programming, whether the code works or not. –  Kristopher Johnson Sep 26 '08 at 17:38
    
To me sloppy code means prototype code that got pushed out the door. By all means that sort of stuff needs to be fixed up –  Robert Gould Sep 27 '08 at 1:30

Yes, I am.

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Me too - but only if I'm going to change it. –  jop Sep 26 '08 at 17:33
    
I'm wondering why answers like this get +4 votes... –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 26 '08 at 17:38
2  
@Pablo: Vote it down if you don't agree. –  GEOCHET Sep 26 '08 at 17:39
    
@Rich: No thanks, its a waste of reputation (-1). –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 26 '08 at 17:42
2  
@Pablo: Then you are not a contributing member of the site, and instead, you are just a rep whore. –  GEOCHET Sep 26 '08 at 17:43

If I inherited code that I will have to make some major modification I must must clean it, refactor (extract methods usually, change some variable names, ...)

I have to make some friendly surrounding before I start making modifications.

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Yes, I am. However, the IDE's are powerful enough that they should go beyond this. Why store formatted Java in files? Compilers don't give a damn about coding style. Store unformatted Java and then apply user-defined coding styles when the file is read. Heck maybe store the Java as XML and use a used-defined XSL file to display the code.

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Yes! As our project grew in size of the development team, it became necessary to establish shared coding guidelines (with Eclipse, its easy) and require code to be formatted per the guidelines. When we hit a good breakpoint, i.e. very few major branches outstanding, we tagged the project, reformatted the whole thing, checked the new formatted code in, and tagged again.

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I sometimes judge the quality of my code just by how it looks. Without even considering what it is actually doing there is a certain "look" that I expect my code to have (lines of code per method, IF statements, comments, general complexity, etc). Almost always when it "looks wrong" there actually ends up being some design flaw.

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Same for me. It's bad when a file contains a mix up style of several coders and I usually talk to the other developers if I think something is really bad there. I expect they handle it similar.

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I am, and I'll rewrite other code if I know the area well enough, and I know they are wastefull. I worked with some ex-Java programmers who, in ruby would write

def foo
  if x == 1
    return true
  else
    return false
  end
end

I felt compelled to rewrite that to

def foo
  x == 1
end

But that's just me.

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Shouldn't that be 'return x == 1'? –  GEOCHET Sep 26 '08 at 17:37
    
Rich: Ruby returns the las expression evaluated. In this case return would be unnecessary. James: I'd go a step further and inline that function too. –  Pablo Fernandez Sep 26 '08 at 17:39
    
@Pablo: Perhaps, but that makes it /less/ readable. –  GEOCHET Sep 26 '08 at 17:41
1  
To me, using return in Ruby, when it is clear that the value will be returned, is like explcitly declaring all variable types in F# or Haskell. It goes against the standard for the community, and probably makes it harder to read for other devs on the project. –  Jim Deville Sep 26 '08 at 18:08
1  
in java, you could also write return x==1, so I don't see these people wouldn't have had the long way of writing it forced on them by the language. –  tunaranch Nov 7 '08 at 7:11
  1. If I just wrote the code, then I clean it up before committing it.
  2. If I need to modify existing code (add new functionality or fix a bug) I refactor it first so that my changes fits in nicely.
  3. But I don't go looking for perfectly working and tested code just to clean it up as I have other things to do (1 and 2).
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  • Do you feel that you have to clean up a file of source code before you can do anything useful?

No, I can ignore general ugliness when modifying other peoples code but I do tidy up around the area that I'm working on. Otherwise it becomes too hard to make sure what I'm doing is right.

  • Do you have the urge to refactor bad structure when you see it?

Yes, absolutely. But you can't give in to every urge, can you?

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There are many forms ugly, but most of the "broken window" offences tend to be purged when I find them. they really frost my lizard:

bad formatting - since we have a pretty printer with standard settings is inexcuseable. I format stuff and commit those changes to satisfy the "its hard to track the change" folks.

code that is commented out and left for dead after a commit.

hints and warnings - especially declared and never used locals. thats just lazy

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Absolutely! Keeping code clean and neatly formatted is the easiest thing you can do to improve readability. The effort required is ridiculously small considering the benefits.

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For formatting I am. If the code isn't indented correctly I don't feel as comfortable with it.

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Thanks for your comment Master Yoda. –  Ed Guiness Sep 26 '08 at 17:37
    
lol I totally didn't notice that. I refuse to edit. –  Matthew Rapati Sep 27 '08 at 2:51

I am not. I value function over form in code.

I try to write neat code, but I don't feel compelled to alter other people's code or reprimand them for their coding styles if their code is functional and not too awful. Everyone has their own tastes, and you need to keep an open mind.

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Yes, I'm always tempted to make things cleaner. I try to resist the urge when I am making minor modifications. If I am doing a major modification, then I will be a little freer in my cleaning and refactoring.

I always feel free to add Javadoc (or whatever is the equivalent in your world) as long as I can understand the existing code well enough to do it accurately.

Another factor is whether you have a good test environment. Whenever someone checks in, our build server kicks off a build and around 20,000 unit tests. That gives a little comfort when refactoring.

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Absolutely. I am constantly refactoring code as I read it, constantly renaming variables, methods, etc. to have names that accurately match their behavior. When I come across code that is too messy to deal with at the current moment, I tag it with a todo so I can come back to it later.

//todo smelly code - reason why code smells (duplicate to function blah, etc.)
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Not as long as its readable and maintainable. I refactor when I see code that isn't both of those (and is reasonable to refactor).

Just changing the formatting or logic style is rude if isn't your code to start with. How would you feel if I went round your house and started re-arranging the furniture?

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Our team uses Resharper in Visual Studio, and we generally remember to run either Cleanup Code or Reformat Code when we check in. Easy, and it ensures that all the nitpicky little things like braces and spacing are all uniform.

We most definitely refactor when we hit areas of bad code. The only caveat there is you can't let yourself get sucked into it - only refactor the part you're working on and resist the urge to extend your modifications further into the system. If you're not careful you might cause your productivity to look low, even if the code is perfect down to EOF markers.

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When someone hands me a giant blob of SQL without any line breaks, I usually have to manually reformat it to follow along and spot errors.

Telling the developer who wrote the code that I'm not as clever as them and need to break it into chunks to read it usually gets me out of any tense confrontations about changing their code.

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It depends on which kind of ugly. I think there are two kinds of ugly. Here's some Rails code that, IMO, is not formatted well:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :posts
  has_many :comments
  validates_presence_of :name
  acts_as_voter
  has_one :community
  validates_presence_of :password 

  def can_has_cheeseburger?
    has_role?(:has_cheeseburger) 
  end 

  def can_vote?
    has_role(:vote)
  end
end

So, that code is a little ugly because it is sorta badly formatted, and sorta needs refactoring. I'd take a "clean as you go" approach. First, if I ever need to touch the associations section of the code, I'd end up doing this:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :posts, :comments, :opinions
  has_one  :community

  validates_presence_of :name
  validates_presence_of :password 

  acts_as_voter

  def can_has_cheeseburger?
    has_role?(:has_cheeseburger) 
  end 

  def can_vote?
    has_role(:vote)
  end
end

Now my code is grouped into logical sections a little more nicely, which makes it easier to find things. If I ever have to touch this class again to add another role-inspection routine, I'd see the need to refactor and either metaprogram the can_* methods, or replace them with:

class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :posts, :comments, :opinions
  has_one  :community

  validates_presence_of :name
  validates_presence_of :password 

  acts_as_voter

  def can_do?(role)
    has_role?(role) 
  end 
end

But I wouldn't rewrite the whole class once I opened it just to feel comfortable with it. That'd be a lot of energy, and I am a lazy programmer. hopefully the good kind of lazy.

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Yes I am, but to a purpose. The act of cleaning up the formatting for instance, which I do by hand, causes me to read the code and understand the logic nesting.

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I approach writing code in very much the same way as I approach writing in general -- Revise, Revise, Revise.

In the first pass, my goal is simply to get my ideas on paper.

In the second pass, I generally try to organize it a nice structure.

In the third pass, I try to polish it as much as I can.

Then I send it to a peer for review, who will mark it up with the red pen.

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I definitely do neaten code that I have to work with. If you're a fellow code neat-freak, you might want to look into the Red Gate SQL formatting tools. They have SQL Prompt and SQL Refactor. I haven't tried either one yet, but they look pretty nice.

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There are different issues you need to manage - especially in a larger team

  1. Merge issues caused by

(a) Different people using different editors/platforms - resulting in different whitespace standards

(b) Different people having different views on EOL vs newline curly braces (K&R style vs others)

  1. You want to free people up - so have code as clean as you can - without wasting people's time. So whatever 'automated cleaning' is available - you should enforce this. In eclipse for java - this limits you to: (a) Curly brace at EOL or not (b) Tabs vs no tabs Any more than this - and you're making it hard for your team unjustifiably.

That's it. The full post on this stuff is here:

http://jumbleagilemanuals.blogspot.com/2008/03/why-your-team-needs-coding-style.html

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I am a code neat freak, but I don't indulge myself. Every edit to working code is a potential liability. I will only clean up code if that is the task at hand. It irks me not to clean it up, but I've learned to let go.

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Yes.
#define uglyCode codeThatDoesNotTellWhatItIsDoing

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