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string s;
cin>>s;
string::iterator it;
it=s.begin();
s.push_back('0');
s.erase(it);
cout<<s<<endl;

everytime I input a 4-letter string such as "milk",it turns out to be core dumped . Other words with more or less than 4 letters can work well. What's wrong ?

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1  
So does it compile or not? What you posted is a compiler error. –  user529758 Dec 29 '12 at 12:17
    
@H2CO3 I think the compiler error is just an aftermath of using Codepad as a public clipboard without posting the full code. Removed - my fault. –  Jan Dvorak Dec 29 '12 at 12:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Modifying a string invalidates any iterators that were generated from the string.

Technically they are only invalidated only if the string re-sizes.
But unless you take explicit precautions to prevent the string re-sizing you must assume that any iterators are invalidated when you add content to the string that increases the size.

See: www.sgi.com/tech/stl/basic_string.html

Note also that, according to the C++ standard, basic_string has very unusual iterator invalidation semantics. Iterators may be invalidated by swap, reserve, insert, and erase (and by functions that are equivalent to insert and/or erase, such as clear, resize, append, and replace).

Additionally, however, the first call to any non-const member function, including the non-const version of begin() or operator[], may invalidate iterators. (The intent of these iterator invalidation rules is to give implementors greater freedom in implementation techniques.) In this implementation, begin(), end(), rbegin(), rend(), operator[], c_str(), and data() do not invalidate iterators.

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try to assign the iterator after you add 0 to the end

string s;
cin>>s;
s.push_back('0');
string::iterator it;
it=s.begin();
s.erase(it);
cout<<s<<endl;
share|improve this answer
1  
If you tell us why this should work you got my upvote. –  Benjamin Bannier Dec 29 '12 at 12:20
    
@honk modifying the data while iterating over it is usually not safe but I can't say for sure.. –  gokcehan Dec 29 '12 at 12:24
    
I agree. An explanation here would probably go a long way. –  chris Dec 29 '12 at 12:24
1  
C++11 21.4.1-p6, "References, pointers, and iterators referring to the elements of a basic_string sequence may be invalidated by the following uses of that basic_string object: - As an argument to any standard library function taking a reference to non-const basic_string as an argument; — Calling non-const member functions, except operator[], at, front, back, begin, rbegin, end, and rend." I do believe push_back() qualifies as a non-const member. –  WhozCraig Dec 29 '12 at 12:27
    
@WhozCraig, Yes, and it's also possible that a memory reallocation occurs, invalidating the iterator. Either way, it's bad and unreliable. –  chris Dec 29 '12 at 12:31

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