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I can't get the DataContractJsonSerializer object to swallow my stream. When I execute the code with the commented-out line active, I get to see the text provided (and it is a parsable JSON object), so I know that the stream is working fine.

However, for some reason, the compiler complains that the streamReader I'm trying to shove down its throat in ReadObject isn't a Stream. Well, isn't it?!

Argument 1: cannot convert from 'System.IO.StreamReader' to 'System.IO.Stream'

What am I missing and how do I resolve it?

using (StreamReader streamReader = new StreamReader(...))
{
  //String responseText = reader.ReadToEnd();
  MyThingy thingy = new MyThingy();
  DataContractJsonSerializer serializer 
    = new DataContractJsonSerializer(thingy.GetType());
  thingy = serializer.ReadObject(streamReader);
}

I'm adapting this example to work with my stream. Should I approach it from a different angle? If so - how?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're trying to put in a reader of a stream instead of an actual stream. Skip the using and whatever hides behind the ellipsis (i.e. whatever you put in as an argument when you create an instance of StreamReader), you can probably put that into the ReadObject.

Also, you'll get into problems when reading the data because ReadObject will return an instance of type Object and you'll need to convert it into MyThingy. Since it's a nullable (I'm assuming), you don't have to type cast but rather as-ify it.

MyThingy thingy = new MyThingy();
DataContractJsonSerializer serializer 
  = new DataContractJsonSerializer(thingy.GetType());
Stream stream = ...;
thingy = serializer.ReadObject(stream) as MyThingy;

You could of course skip the next-to-last line and put the stream directly into the last line.

Courtesy of @JohanLarsson (all Swedes are great, especially those from Stockholm, like me):
In case you can't or don't want to omit the StreamReader declaration in your using statement, I'd suggest that you take a look at BaseStream property to get to it.

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You can try this:

using (StreamReader streamReader = new StreamReader(...))
{
  DataContractJsonSerializer serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(MyThingy));
  MyThingy thingy = (MyThingy) serializer.ReadObject(streamReader.BaseStream);
}
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Is it necessary to create the reader of a stream just to get the stream back out of it? Is it perhaps advised for some reason? –  Konrad Viltersten Dec 29 '12 at 12:36
    
@KonradViltersten No I don't think so I upvoted your answer, was gonna add that to mine post but you answered before. I'll leave mine until someone says it is plain wrong :) –  Johan Larsson Dec 29 '12 at 12:39
    
I don't think it's wrong. In fact, I didn't even think of using BaseStream so I think it's good it's here and you should definitely leave it here (until, as you said, someone cleaver comes along and bashes us both). +1 for the creativity to you. Also, I'm ripping off your hint. :) –  Konrad Viltersten Dec 29 '12 at 12:41

I've been always using this:

 // get stuff here
 String json = GetJSON();

 List<T> result;
 using (var ms = new MemoryStream(Encoding.Unicode.GetBytes(json)))
 {
      var serializer = new DataContractJsonSerializer(typeof(List<T>));
      result = (List<T>)serializer.ReadObject(ms);
 }   
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