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Currently I have to create a parameterized test class for every method that I want to test with several different inputs. Is there a way to add this together in one file?

Right now there's CalculatorTestAdd.java which has a set of parameters that are used to check if the Add() function works properly. Is there a possbility for me to 'connect' this set to the Add() function and create an additional set meant for the Subtract() method and add this method in the same test class, resulting in one file called CalculatorTest.java?

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Too bad you use JUnit... TestNG has exactly what you want with its @DataProvider. – fge Dec 29 '12 at 13:20
    
@fge yeah, but it isn't too hard with JUnit - I've done it before. You just have to jump though a couple of hoops. – Bohemian Dec 29 '12 at 13:28
    
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes. There's nothing special you have to do. For every set of value(s) of the parameters, each @Test method is run once, so just have one method test add() and another method test subtract().

May I also add that the person who is dictating this requirement is misguided. There is little value in dictating certain design patterns "for all cases" - might as well hire trained monkeys.

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1  
This seems to work, but it also means half of my tests fail. While it does what I want to do, am I to assume this is as good as it gets? – Jeroen Vannevel Dec 29 '12 at 13:29
    
Put you as solved since it solves my problem indeed, but if anyone has a more elegant solution which can bypass the side-effect that causes me to fail a lot of tests with parameters that aren't meant for that test (and thus don't give me a nice, green bar), I'd be happy to hear it. – Jeroen Vannevel Dec 29 '12 at 14:12
    
This is why I added my final paragraph. Dictating restrictions like this can only lead to problems. The best solution is to have multiple test classes; one that uses once set of parameters, another for a second set, maybe another that doesn't use parameters. Basically do what you need to do and tell your team leader why you did it. Hopefully he will see the light. If not, go over his head and explain why his "coding rules" are causing problems and will both harm the quality of the software and delay the project. I gather you are not using Continuous Integration... you should use it. – Bohemian Dec 29 '12 at 18:12
    
@JeroenVannevel if you can somehow distinguish the parameters which are not meant for a specific test method, you can use the assume* set of methods to omit the running of those parameters for those methods. Those will then be counted as "skipped", just like when using @Ignore (but they can run for other parameters). – Paŭlo Ebermann Oct 19 '15 at 17:50

This answer is similar to Tarek's one (the parametrized part), although I think it is a bit more extensible. Also solves your problem and you won't have failed tests if everything is correct:

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class CalculatorTest {
    enum Type {SUBSTRACT, ADD};
    @Parameters
    public static Collection<Object[]> data(){
        return Arrays.asList(new Object[][] {
          {Type.SUBSTRACT, 3.0, 2.0, 1.0},
          {Type.ADD, 23.0, 5.0, 28.0}
        });
    }

    private Type type;
    private Double a, b, expected;

    public CalculatorTest(Type type, Double a, Double b, Double expected){
        this.type = type;
        this.a=a; this.b=b; this.expected=expected;
    }

    @Test
    public void testAdd(){
        Assume.assumeTrue(type == Type.ADD);
        assertEquals(expected, Calculator.add(a, b));
    }

    @Test
    public void testSubstract(){
        Assume.assumeTrue(type == Type.SUBSTRACT);
        assertEquals(expected, Calculator.substract(a, b));
    }
}
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An elegant workaround. This is like saying "this test method applies only to this data set". This allows the flexibility to have e.g. 2 test methods that use data set 1 and 3 test methods that use data set 2. – Henno Vermeulen Aug 11 '15 at 8:07

you can use parameters with https://github.com/piotrturski/zohhak:

@TestWith({
   "1, 7, 8",
   "2, 9, 11"
})
public void addTest(int number1, int number2, int expectedResult) {
    BigDecimal result = calculator.add(number1, number2);
    assertThat(result).isEqualTo...
}

if you want to load parameters from file, you can use http://code.google.com/p/fuzztester/ or http://code.google.com/p/junitparams/

and if you need real flexibility you can use junit's @Parameterized but it clutters your code. you can also use junit's Theories - but it seems an overkill for calculator tests

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I'm sure you are not having this problem anymore, but I thought of 3 ways you can do this, each with its pros and cons. With the Parameterized runner, you'll have to use a workaround.

- Using more parameters with Parameterized

In case you have to load the parameters externally, you simply add a parameter for the expected results.

Pros: less coding, and it runs all the tests.

Cons: new parameters for each different set of tests.

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class CalculatorTest extends TestCase {
    private Calculator calculator;
    private int operator1;
    private int operator2;
    private int expectedSum;
    private int expectedSub;

    public CalculatorTest(int operator1, int operator2, int expectedSum, int expectedSub) {
        this.operator1 = operator1;
        this.operator2 = operator2;
    }

    @Params
    public static Collection<Object[]> setParameters() {
        Collection<Object[]> params = new ArrayList<>();
        // load the external params here
        // this is an example
        params.add(new Object[] {2, 1, 3, 1});
        params.add(new Object[] {5, 2, 7, 3});

        return params;
    }

    @Before
    public void createCalculator() {
        calculator = new Calculator();
    }

    @Test
    public void addShouldAddTwoNumbers() {
        assertEquals(expectedSum, calculator.add(operator1, operator2));
    }

    @Test
    public void subtractShouldSubtractTwoNumbers() {
        assertEquals(expectedSub, calculator.subtract(operator1, operator2));
    }

    @After
    public void endTest() {
        calculator = null;
        operator1 = null;
        operator2 = null;
        expectedSum = null;
        expectedSub = null;
    }
}

- Not using Parameterized runner

This works fine if you set your parameters programatically.

Pros: You can have as many tests as you want without having to set a huge set of parameters.

Cons: More coding, and it stops at the first failure (which might not be a con).

@RunWith(JUnit4.class)
public class CalculatorTest extends TestCase {
    private Calculator calculator;

    @Before
    public void createCalculator() {
        calculator = new Calculator();
    }

    @Test
    public void addShouldAddTwoNumbers() {
        int[] operator1 = {1, 3, 5};
        int[] operator2 = {2, 7, 9};
        int[] expectedResults = {3, 10, 14};

        for (int i = 0; i < operator1.length; i++) {
            int actualResult = calculator.add(operator1[i], operator2[i]);
            assertEquals(expectedResults[i], actualResult);
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void subtractShouldSubtractTwoNumbers() {
        int[] operator1 = {5, 8, 7};
        int[] operator2 = {1, 2, 10};
        int[] expectedResults = {4, 6, -3};

        for (int i = 0; i < operator1.length; i++) {
            int actualResult = calculator.subtract(operator1[i], operator2[i]);
            assertEquals(expectedResults[i], actualResult);
        }
    }

    @After
    public void endTest() {
        calculator = null;
    }
}

- Using JUnitParams

I have no affiliation with Pragmatists, I just found this a few days ago. This framework runs on top of JUnit and handles parameterized tests differently. Parameters are passed directly to the test method, so you can have in the same class different params for different methods.

Pros: achieves the same results as the solutions above without workarounds.

Cons: maybe your company doesn't allow you add a new dependency to the project or forces you to use some bizarre coding rule (like using the Parameterized runners exclusively). Let's face it, it happens more than we'd like to.

Here's a fine example of JUnitParams in action, and you can get the project/check the code on this Github page.

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