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I know a way to read from a stream and use it like below:

strstream s; // It can be another standard stream type
// ...
while (!s.eof())
{
  char buf[MAX];
  s.read(buf, sizeof (buf));
  int count = s.gcount();

  THIRD_PARTY_FUNCTION(buf, count);
  // ...
}

but this code has an abusing point, It first copies data from the stream to buf and then passes buf to THIRD_PARTY_FUNCTION.

Is there any way to reform the code to something like below(I mean below code avoids an extra copy) ?

strstream s; // It can be another standard stream type
// ...
while (!s.eof())
{

  char *buf = A_POINTER_TO_DATA_OF_STREAM(s);
  int count = AVAIABLE_DATA_SIZE_OF_STREAM(s);
  // Maybe it needs s.seekg(...) here

  THIRD_PARTY_FUNCTION(buf, count);
  // ...
}
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4  
Note: while(!s.eof()) is an anti pattern. Don't do that. A read failure will lock you into an infinite loop. The standard pattern is: while(s.read(buf,sizeof(buf)) –  Loki Astari Dec 29 '12 at 13:19
    
@LokiAstari: Thanks, I will mind your advice. –  deepmax Dec 29 '12 at 13:21
1  
Note: strstream is deprecated. std::stringstream is now the stream constructed from a string. –  Loki Astari Dec 29 '12 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

Something like this might work for you.

char           buffer[2000];
std::istream&  s = getStreamReference();
s.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buffer, 2000);

while(s)
{
    THIRD_PARTY_FUNCTION(buffer, s.rdbuf()->in_avail());
    s.ignore(s.rdbuf()->in_avail());

    // Not sure this may go into an infinite loop.
    // Its late here so I have not tested it.
}

Note sure I care about the cost of copying a 2K buffer.
The profiling would have to show that this is a real hotspot that is causing a significant degrade in performance before I would look at making this kind of optimization. Readability is going to be my most important factor here 99% of the time.

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You can convert a std::stringstream to a c-style string by first calling its member method str to get an std::string and then call the member function c_str of that to convert it to a c-style null-terminated char[].

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