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ArrayList<ArrayList<String>> list1 = new ArrayList<ArrayList<String>>();
ArrayList<String> list2 = new ArrayList<String>();

list2.add("foo");
System.out.println(list2); //[foo]
list1.add(list2);
System.out.println(list1); //[[foo]]
list2.set(0, "bar");
System.out.println(list2); //[bar]
System.out.println(list1); //[[bar]]

The code above shows 2 lists. When I add list2 (containing foo) to list1 they both now contain foo. But when I modify list2 to bar, list1 will change as well. I've always thought the add method only gives a copy of list2 to list1 and what I do to list2 will not change for list1.

How can I make it that I add list2 to list1 but allow list2 to be freely modified in the future so list1 will not be affected again?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

In Java references are passed by value, not the object referenced. This means that list2.add(list1); cannot alter the reference list1 but it takes a reference to the same object and if you change that it is visible.

The way you should write this is

List<List<String>> list1 = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
List<String> list2 = new ArrayList<String>();

list2.add("foo");
System.out.println(list2); //[foo]
list1.add(new ArrayList<String>(list2)); // take a copy of the list.
System.out.println(list1); //[[foo]]
list2.set(0, "bar");
System.out.println(list2); //[bar]
System.out.println(list1); //[[foo]]

or

list1.add(list2); 
list2 = new ArrayList<String>();
list2.add("bar");
System.out.println(list2); //[bar]
System.out.println(list1); //[[foo]]

My example above is simple but my actual problem is buried in nested loops and such.

List<List<String>> list1 = new ArrayList<List<String>>();

for(some loop) {
    List<String> list2 = new ArrayList<String>();
    // populate list2, can be smaller than the previous list2 !!
    list1.add(list2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm curious: Why not clone? – nhahtdh Dec 29 '12 at 14:56
    
Awesome thanks. Just wondering if this is the cleanest way to do it? My example above is simple but my actual problem is buried in nested loops and such. – meiryo Dec 29 '12 at 14:57
1  
@meiryo there is a simple solution, don't re-use the same list by moving this declaration into the nest loop. – Peter Lawrey Dec 29 '12 at 15:00
3  
@nhahtdh It is generally not a good idea to use the collection specific methods. It usually means you are trying to do something unusual and suspect. BTW ArrayList.clone() returns an Object which you have to cast with an unchecked warning which is rather ugly. – Peter Lawrey Dec 29 '12 at 15:02
3  
@nhahtdh..Also it is not advisable to use clone() method in general. Whenever you need to use it, use a copy constructor instead, which is being done here. – Rohit Jain Dec 29 '12 at 15:03

How about list1.add(list2.clone()); ? This will create a copy of list2 (allocate memory, clone contents etc) and put reference to it in list1.

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2  
While this is technically correct, it is better to add more information into the answer. – nhahtdh Dec 29 '12 at 14:55
    
Using clone() has the disavantage that if you have a new list with less elements for some reason, the previous elements will be left as they were. – Peter Lawrey Dec 29 '12 at 15:04

You should clone every item and add to a new list.

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