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I'm trying to rewrite some code I wrote time ago with a functional language (OCaml) into C++.

My problem can be shortened into:

  • I have a stack of values
  • a value can be of a variant type (so a set of different kinds of values, eg int, float, std::string, std::list whatever)
  • I want to define operators which work on the values (eg an addition operation which pops two values and pushes the sum of them)
  • some operators behaves differently according to the types which are found on the stack, ideally some operators even change the number of arguments according to the type (a simple example: addition operator could pop one value, if it's a std::list then push the operator applied between all values of the list, otherwise pops another value and do the addition if they're both float)

Up to now I've been able to make it work by using templates eg.

class Value
{
  public:
    Value(Type type) : type(type) { }

    virtual string svalue() const = 0;
    virtual string lvalue();

    virtual bool equals(Value *value) const = 0;
    virtual Value* clone() const = 0;

    const Type type;

    virtual ~Value() { };
}

template <class T>
class TValue : public Value
{
  protected:
    T value;

  public:
    TValue(Type type, T value) : Value(type), value(value) {}

    void set(T value) { this->value = value; }
    T get() const { return this->value; }
};

class Int : public TValue<int>
{
  private:

  public:  
    Int(int value) : TValue<int>(TYPE_INT, value) { };

    virtual string svalue() const;

    virtual bool equals(Value *value) const { return this->value == ((TValue<int>*)value)->get(); }
    virtual Value *clone() const { return new Int(value); }
};

and then operators are interpreted by doing

Value *v1, *v2,
case OP_PLUS:
{
  if (vm->popTwo(&v1, &v2))
  {  
    switch (v1->type << 4 | v2->type)
    {
      case TYPES(TYPE_INT, TYPE_INT): vm->push(new Int(((Int*)v1)->get() + ((Int*)v2)->get())); break;
      case TYPES(TYPE_FLOAT, TYPE_INT): vm->push(new Float(((Float*)v1)->get() + ((Int*)v2)->get())); break;
      case TYPES(TYPE_INT, TYPE_FLOAT): vm->push(new Float(((Int*)v1)->get() + ((Float*)v2)->get())); break;
      case TYPES(TYPE_FLOAT, TYPE_FLOAT): vm->push(new Float(((Float*)v1)->get() + ((Float*)v2)->get())); break;
    }
  }
  break;
}

Now, this works but I don't like the approach because it sounds quite clumsy, it requires a lot of type casts and it is not elegant at all (compared to my functional implementation). I'm starting to looking into boost library to see if I can find a better way to manage everything, before starting with it I was trying to define a different way of defining operators such as

template <Opcode T, class X, class A>
class Unary
{
public:
  static A* ptr(X* x)
  {
    cout << "Missing instruction!" << endl;
    return NULL;
  };
};


template <>
class Unary<OP_MINUS, Float, Float>
{
  public:
    static Float *ptr(Float *x) { return new Float(-x->get()); };
}; 

So that I'm able to do

Float *a = new Float(10);
Float *r = Unary<OP_MINUS, Float, Float>::ptr(f);

This works but I'm still unable to see how I am supposed to manage it in a generic way so that I can call the right function according to what is found on the stack and which operators is used.

Will boost help me somehow? What I would like to have is a solution that is type safe and elegant at the same time but boost has so many different libraries that is hard for me to just understand what to look for. I don't need to use it if there is something easier that I am missing, I didn't think to find so many difficulties when dropping a functional language for this kind of task.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand the objective. What are you trying to achieve? State the problem and the requirements. –  Nawaz Dec 29 '12 at 17:00
    
Seems like boost::variant and its associated visitor may be worth looking into. –  Chad Dec 29 '12 at 17:21

1 Answer 1

You want boost::variant, and for the list-of-elements, boost::make_recursive_variant (so you can refer to the type inside the type).

While apply_visitor lets you apply a function to many types, I find something like this easier to think about to start (assuming C++11 support in your compiler):

template<typename T, typename Func, typename Types...>
bool TryApplyFuncOn( boost::variant<Types...>& var, Func f ) {
  struct HelperVisitor {
    HelperVisitor( Func f_ ):func(f_) {}
    Func func;
    typedef bool return_type;
    template<typename U>
    return_type operator()( U& unused ) { return false; }
    return_type operator()( T& t ) { f(t); return true; }
  };
  return boost::apply_visitor( HelperVisitor(f), var );
}

which takes a type you want to apply a function on, and a variant, and applies it iff the type you asked to be applied is the type in the variant. It returns true if it found a match.

The general case lets you do this "in one pass".

So you can do something like:

// easy case:
typedef boost::variant<int,double> scalar;
scalar times_two(scalar const& left) {
  scalar retval = left;
  TryApplyFuncOn<int>( retval, []( int& value ){ value*=2; } );
  TryApplyFuncOn<double>( retval, []( double& value ){ value*=2.; } );
  return retval;
}
// tricky case:
scalar multiply(scalar const& left, scalar const& right) {
  scalar retval = left;
  TryApplyFuncOn<int>( retval, [&right]( int& left_value ){
    TryApplyFuncOn<int>( right, [&left_value]( int& right_value ){
      left_value *= right_value;
    });
    TryApplyFuncOn<double>( right, [&left_value]( double& right_value ){
      left_value *= right_value;
    });
  });
  TryApplyFuncOn<double>( retval, [&right]( double& left_value ){
    TryApplyFuncOn<int>( right, [&left_value]( int& right_value ){
      left_value *= right_value;
    });
    TryApplyFuncOn<double>( right, [&left_value]( double& right_value ){
      left_value *= right_value;
    });
  });
  return retval;
}

which doesn't yet do type promotion (so int*double doesn't become a double), but there isn't anything fundamental stopping that.

Make sense?

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